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View Full Version : Big Dayton Blower


Pete Ridabock
05-11-2015, 08:16 PM
model # 6K338E, Volts 115/230, Amps 16.4/8.2, HP 1.5, RPM 3450. Was owned by Salamandra . George ran two furnaces and a glory hole with it. about 60lbs.

James Burts
05-11-2015, 08:33 PM
I may be interested. Is it the blower, or the motor? When I did a search for the model number, I came up with motors but didn't see any blowers. If it's a blower, what are you looking to get for it?

Pete VanderLaan
05-11-2015, 08:47 PM
I have an 8 and a 10 inch dayton impellar type I would sell as well

James Burts
05-11-2015, 09:00 PM
I'm thrilled to see that there are options available. I'm involved in getting a shop setup, and the next item on our agenda is ventilation.

Pete VanderLaan
05-12-2015, 05:46 AM
blowers aren't for ventilation. Blowers move forced air for combustion. Fans are used for ventilation. Something of a difference. Perhaps the one Peter has is for a duct system drawing air up, I don't know. Mine are forced air.

James Burts
05-12-2015, 09:13 AM
In particular, I'm looking for a solution to assist the draw from the hoods over the furnace, glory holes, and perhaps the annealer as well. I was assuming that a blower would be able to assist in that. If not, what would you recommend I look for? I've tried searching the forum, but haven't come across much on this topic.

Thanks.

--James--

Eben Horton
05-12-2015, 09:48 AM
Blow out some holes in the wall and install fans. Or go up through the roof and install a fan on the roof.

Tom Fuhrman
05-12-2015, 09:57 AM
used restaurant exhaust fans can be very useful for ventilation. they mount outside and are made for moving hot air in big volumes. Used restaurant supply houses are also a good place to find metal exhaust hoods. I've used both in the past.

Rick Kellner
05-12-2015, 12:15 PM
Do you know what the output of the blower is in CFM? Consider me interested.

Pete VanderLaan
05-12-2015, 02:04 PM
In particular, I'm looking for a solution to assist the draw from the hoods over the furnace, glory holes, and perhaps the annealer as well. I was assuming that a blower would be able to assist in that. If not, what would you recommend I look for? I've tried searching the forum, but haven't come across much on this topic.

Thanks.

--James--
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My opinion is that blowers do a lot better at pushing air than they do at pulling it. Calculate the cubic footage in your proposed shop and ideally size your exhaust fans ( Note fans) so that you can change the air in your studio once every two minutes at a minimum. Anything less than that will be a hot studio. When I was doing a lot of toxic melting in Santa Fe, I had an air change in the furnace room once every 20 seconds.
You have to have make-up air which is clean air coming in from outside in an unrestricted way. What you don't want to do is to churn that air which is easy to do so consider where you will source your intake so you don't get frozen in cold weather. Have the fans go out as Eben suggests. A true test for your hood is to hold damp lit newspaper in front of your hood trying to light up. The smoke should all get drawn into the hood.

Shutter type fans 24 inch- 30 inch are really nice but they are expensive. On average, they will draw about 3,000 CFM. The Santa Fe act drew 30,000 CFM. My current hood only draws 6,000 but I keep a small hood now and it seems quite servicable for what I currently do. I hope that helps.

Rich Arentzen
05-12-2015, 03:47 PM
One of those big round kitchen exhaust fans on the roof or a side wall work well. Grainger sells them or they are often on Craigslist

Glenn Randle
05-14-2015, 08:46 AM
Fans for greenhouses & large warehouses are good. I got mine from FarmTek, but don't really appreciate the 20 years of constant catalogs that they refuse to stop filling my mailbox with. I use a speed control & dial it down when high is too much. I have a window near the bench, which feels like an A/C.