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Jesse Bogenrief
11-15-2018, 10:30 PM
I use a 5 gallon bucket to catch my grinding waste water. I try to let it settle then dump the water off the top. It takes to long and i don't want to dump glass. Any suggestions? Is there a filter?

Rosanna Gusler
11-16-2018, 06:02 AM
You can use a 2 or3 bucket cascade.. I do not worry about grinder residue. I just dump it in the yard. Really no difference than sand . Just do not put it down any drain.

Pete VanderLaan
11-16-2018, 07:29 AM
my 120 machine has two buckets that are about 3 gallons each. The drain on the machine goes first into a sieve, then the first bucket, then out a slot to the second bucket and then into a 35 gallon trash can. After each working session, the buckets get pulled and laid on their sides to drain. Then the next morning, the grit is taken out quite dry and re-introduced into the grit process.

This is of course a grit based system. The 35 gallon bucket is like a geological study of how the earth was formed. Just tons of differing strata.

It was demonstrated that if you grind lead glasses, it can be absorbed through your skin, so consider that. Steuben destroyed their machines instead of selling them over that issue. Schott had some elevated lead issues as well.

Pete VanderLaan
11-16-2018, 07:30 AM
You can use a 2 or3 bucket cascade.. I do not worry about grinder residue. I just dump it in the yard. Really no difference than sand . Just do not put it down any drain.
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not quite like sand. The residue is representative of what you are grinding.

Rosanna Gusler
11-18-2018, 06:07 AM
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not quite like sand. The residue is representative of what you are grinding.

True. Should have said" assuming soda lime glasses" .

Pete VanderLaan
11-18-2018, 07:35 AM
don't leave out the chromophores, selenium, cadmium, chrome, cobalt nickle, blah blah blah.

I take mine to the transfer station. It goes in the industrial waste container. Probably after that, the ocean.

Rosanna Gusler
11-18-2018, 05:33 PM
don't leave out the chromophores, selenium, cadmium, chrome, cobalt nickle, blah blah blah.

I take mine to the transfer station. It goes in the industrial waste container. Probably after that, the ocean.
But isn't that stuff all bound up in the glass? Food safe glasses anyhow.

Jordan Kube
11-18-2018, 08:24 PM
But isn't that stuff all bound up in the glass? Food safe glasses anyhow.

Yes and no. For everyday household food use, absolutely. Buried in the ground the glasses we use leach more than you might think, especially over time exposed to moisture. The grinding is breaking it down mechanically and exposing more surface area to leach. Probably not too big a deal in the grand scheme of things. How many people improperly dispose of batteries in this country? Just do your best with the glass. Figure out a way to capture and separate the solids and you'll be fine.

Pete VanderLaan
11-19-2018, 01:12 PM
The EU is focused in on glass in landfills, particularly chrome based glasses but the investigation is spreading. A number of years ago, when I was visiting Schott in Duryea fairly regularly, Bill Wash told me that the people grinding glass there appeared to have elevated lead levels. Now that could come from two sources, one, your skin, and two, the mist created in grinding that you breathe.

I simply cannot imagine trying to wear gloves grinding glass, it's slippery enough as it is. The mist, I can believe. A respirator is not a bad idea , just an ungainly one.. The larger point is that it's an interactive medium. That said, Jordan has it about right that you should be as careful as you can. As to the liquid, I don't really know but I do think potters are reckless if they mix glazes in buckets with bare arms.

Interaction is interesting. A number of years back, we planted garden materials in some copper containers that were about six feet long and a foot deep. Nothing would grow in them at all.

Rich Samuel
11-19-2018, 01:39 PM
There are endless arguments online about copper being bad or not for plants. Lots of discussions of copper planters and roof runoff. Best I can figure is there must be some kind of coating used or the "copper" isn't true Cu. No one, though, debates its killing effect on moss. I can vouch for that.

Art Freas
11-19-2018, 02:15 PM
Water matters too. Basic water from the tap can vary widely and the acidity and alkalinity can have a big impact on what leaches in to the water.

Rosanna Gusler
11-20-2018, 07:15 AM
Copper is one of those weird metals. Plants need some but you can kill a tree by pounding a few copper nails in the trunk. Interesting stuff.

Greg Vriethoff
11-20-2018, 07:52 AM
copper sulfate is used in commercial "root killer." You flush it down the toilet to clear roots that have grown into the sewer lines. Only destroys the exposed roots. Doesn't actually harm the tree.

Terry Crider
11-20-2018, 01:32 PM
Copper sulfate dust or spray also kills a lot of diseases on garden plants and no damage to the plant.

Pete VanderLaan
11-20-2018, 05:35 PM
Ah well, the thread is officially hijacked.
Answering the original question, use more than one bucket for the water and develop patience. An aquarium filter would clean it really well. Don't drink it.

bob gent
11-24-2018, 08:59 AM
there's some chance of stuff leaching out, I'll bet it depends on surface area of the particles, which when they're super fine, increases the chance of leaching.
I have a water pump from an old soda fountain carbonator. I recycle my water and run it through three buckets, each settling out a little more stuff. I just hate to waste water. Though on reflection, I guess that water is just getting more toxic the longer the swarf stews in it.
I also use an additive from CRL, that's supposed to slow the corrosion on my equipment and maybe help settle the swarf. Dunno if that helps or hurts in regard to toxicity