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View Full Version : Corning Batch Co.


Gregory Nangle
02-23-2011, 09:59 AM
does anyone here use Corning batch co glass? thoughts ,feelings,unfounded conjectures? i am using the ultra clear batch for now.

Pete VanderLaan
02-23-2011, 01:49 PM
Unfounded conjectures?

My experience with Louis is that he is straightforward and honest. I have not ever heard any complaints about his products. My impression is that a lot of people use his products because it cuts down on their shipping costs.

Guy Kass
02-23-2011, 03:09 PM
Greg-

Talk to Jeff over in Clayton at New Fislerville Glass. I'm 99% sure he is using it.

Guy

Gregory Nangle
02-23-2011, 04:06 PM
Hey Guy!

yeah i have been using the ultra clear stuff lately and i find it to be better suited to what i do with it, just curious what the more standard experinces are like. i think the stuff is fantastic to work with and cheap to ship, plus lewis is a great resource.has anyone else noticed what the differences are between the standard batch and the ultra clear? i mean ,i can tell its different just not sure in what way.

Hugh Jenkins
02-23-2011, 04:28 PM
Greg, please say more about melting, what kind of things you find to be good. Annealing point, etc.

Brian Gingras
02-23-2011, 05:34 PM
I'm melting it here. Went with it becuase I used it first at another studio and the price was way cheaper than SP and the shipping was less. I'm melting at 2250, great glass 8 hours after my last charge. I find the regular batch to be "whiter" than SP w/ER, not sure how the ultra clear would compare as my regular stuff has zero color to it. Annealing in my kiln is 920.

Gregory Nangle
02-23-2011, 06:05 PM
Greg, please say more about melting, what kind of things you find to be good. Annealing point, etc.

well, i melt it at around 2275-2300 in a 600 lb tank furnace charging once an hour or so at about 75 pounds a clip. melts for four or so hours, crush it, and boom,great glass . I use it for very thick things ,so the density is way more apparent on castings, rather than blown ware etc. the annealing point i use is 930. the stuff is pretty remarkable, and part of the reason i made this thread was to confirm my suspicion that not too many other people are using it ,most likely because it is so traumatic to take a risk on new stuff, i know i was nervous about it when i started using it, now i cant see using anything else.

Gary Guydosh
02-24-2011, 12:28 AM
I have been using it for the past 2.5 years. I like its, nice work time. I melt it at 2200 for 6 hours, makes a very clean,soft glass.

GOOD STUFF

Franklin Sankar
03-22-2012, 11:53 AM
Is this the same batch they used to use in Corning studio/plant?
Franklin

Pete VanderLaan
03-22-2012, 03:23 PM
Nope....... I don't think so.

Franklin Sankar
03-23-2012, 06:52 AM
Thanks , nice name.
Franklin

Pete VanderLaan
03-23-2012, 07:49 AM
The town of Corning really made an effort to attract other glass businesses to the area. They offered low interest loans to glass studios to draw them in and that worked to a degree. Corning Glass Works suffered huge losses and laid of over 3,000 employees back in the late nineties and that's a small town. My understanding was that they were hugely overinvested in optical fibre. The shock was huge. Selling Steuben was a necessity but it was kind of like selling one of your kidneys to pay medical bills.

Ben Solwitz
03-24-2012, 11:34 AM
I actually just bought some stock the other day, it's really cheap right now and I think it's still a very solid company. Good debt/equity, no deficit in the past 5 years, price/book is only 1.03, etc. Pretty solid financials, which is mostly what I care about. Got a soft spot for it too, but hopefully I didn't let that influence my judgement.

Pete VanderLaan
03-24-2012, 12:04 PM
It seems to fluctuate between 17.50 and $20.00

Tom Fuhrman
03-24-2012, 02:16 PM
Pete: don't know where you've been but my Corning stock hasn't been in that range for quite some time.
I do remember though in the past when fiber optics took a big hit that it was down to 5. I think almost all of their manufacturing is now off shore but their tech sector and research is still here. As I recall they do still pay a little dividend.

Cecil McKenzie
03-24-2012, 04:22 PM
Corning closed at around 14.00 on Friday, has a PE of 7.92 and is paying a little over 2 percent dividend. It is a company that has continued to reinvent itself with ongoing technological research . They make a lot of that thin glass everyone wants for displays. I'm a big fan of Corelle plates and bowls.

What do you think Corelle cups would do if heated in a glory hole ? Are they glass or ceramic? Is there strength from tension in the piece. I have wondered if they could be used for a short lived crucible?

Tom Clifton
03-24-2012, 07:11 PM
Corelle ...Glass or ceramic? Is there strength from tension in the piece.

I would say glass - like opal pyrex. And tension... We have Corelle dining ware that is ready for retirement. It gets old and well used (scratched) and if you drop it, or sometimes even bump it on another piece that is in the cupboard it absolutely explodes into shards. Had the bottom of a cereal bowl drop out last week. At least that one was easy to clean up.

Pete VanderLaan
03-25-2012, 06:42 AM
Scratched Corel and scratched pyrex really let go when they do it. The shards are never very sharp either. It won't work for a crucible, really... Fused silica will work, once.

Pete VanderLaan
03-25-2012, 06:48 AM
Pete: don't know where you've been but my Corning stock hasn't been in that range for quite some time.
I do remember though in the past when fiber optics took a big hit that it was down to 5. I think almost all of their manufacturing is now off shore but their tech sector and research is still here. As I recall they do still pay a little dividend.
********
It was there two years back so that's quite a drop. My VISA on the happy hand has gone from a low of 68 two year back to its current 118. My whole IRA is in that and I cash out in four months so to speak. Mastercard went from down as low as about 200 to it's current high around 400. That's real movement.

Corning jobs out most of its work to Schott except for fiber optics as I understand it. I think that's even true of the pyrex.

Tom Clifton
03-25-2012, 08:38 AM
From Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corelle)

"Corelle is a brand of glassware and dishware. It is made of Vitrelle, a laminated tempered glass product with three layers of two types of glass. The thermally bonded layers give Corelle its strength, allowing it to be much thinner than other dinnerware. Introduced by Corning Glass Works in 1970, it is now manufactured and sold by World Kitchen. Corelle is chemical resistant, durable, and lightweight: A typical Corelle dinner plate measuring 26 centimetres across weighs 355 grams.:
.
.
.
"Safety

Sudden temperature changes and other damages have been shown to cause serious structural harm, raising the risk of shattering at a later time.[1]"

Pete VanderLaan
03-25-2012, 09:04 AM
I love that: "Serious structural harm". It belongs in the dictionary near "Misspoke"

Tom Fuhrman
03-25-2012, 09:07 AM
[QUOTE=Tom Clifton;104208]From Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corelle)

"Corelle is a brand of glassware and dishware. It is made of Vitrelle, a laminated tempered glass product with three layers of two types of glass. The thermally bonded layers give Corelle its strength, allowing it to be much thinner than other dinnerware. Introduced by Corning Glass Works in 1970, it is now manufactured and sold by World Kitchen. Corelle is chemical resistant, durable, and lightweight: A typical Corelle dinner plate measuring 26 centimetres across weighs 355 grams.:
.
.This is interesting . I can't imagine how this is exactly true as I was in one of their factories watching them make Corelle plates many years ago. They had a furnace that was about 20 ft. in dia. and about 20ft. tall with no top to it. They had a rotating trough that distributed batch on top of the furnace and it eventually melted it's way down to the bottom where it was extruded into a thin 12" wide ribbon and then pressed and vacuumed/ sucked out of the ribbon. How that could have been 3 layers of 2 types of glasses is beyond me. It was the most fascinating furnace I've ever seen though. I think that was back in 91. The unmelted batch was literally the top of the furnace.

Ben Solwitz
03-25-2012, 03:12 PM
Didn't World Kitchen start using soft glass for Corning's 'pyrex' bakeware when Corning sold it to them?

Tom Clifton
03-25-2012, 04:05 PM
Didn't World Kitchen start using soft glass for Corning's 'pyrex' bakeware when Corning sold it to them?

Are you asking because of the Jan 2011 article in Consumer Reports that World Kitchen wrote this request for informaton (http://www.worldkitchen.com/usr/ResponseToCR1.pdf) about?

I don't subscribe to Consumer Reports and haven't seen the original article, but there are a ton of rebuttals (http://pyrexware.com/index.asp?pageId=30) of many of CR's claims, inbcluding Snopes (http://www.snopes.com/food/warnings/pyrex.asp)

(1) Is this another class action settlement lurking on the back burner?
(2) Is this thread getting seriously off topic and should we move to Cords & Stones???

( I remember reading the archives about the "Free Range Chickens of the Glass World" and a "Quota of Off Topic"...)

Alexander Adams
03-25-2012, 06:18 PM
I've been very pleased with CBG's Standard Formula. Any glass program head that complains that their annual budget is too small and is still melting Spectrum Nuggets needs to have their head examined. I cut the material budget down here by nearly half. More student work survives and the furnace is happier. No one has to lug, lift or hoist a 50 sack of batch or nuggets.

Pete VanderLaan
03-25-2012, 06:22 PM
No one has to lug, lift or hoist a 50 sack of batch or nuggets.
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Why is Corning batch special in this regard? Does fifty lbs of Corning weigh less somehow than SP87?

Allan Gott
03-25-2012, 10:16 PM
Website says they bag in 25 lb lots. Price isn't much different than SP unless I'm missing something.

Pete VanderLaan
03-26-2012, 04:40 PM
Pete: don't know where you've been but my Corning stock hasn't been in that range for quite some time.
I do remember though in the past when fiber optics took a big hit that it was down to 5. I think almost all of their manufacturing is now off shore but their tech sector and research is still here. As I recall they do still pay a little dividend.
**********
I'm not sure what you look at CGW ( Corning Glass Works ) was at about $21.00 today.

Jordan Kube
03-26-2012, 04:54 PM
We've got free range threads here, Tom. It seems if something doesn't start out off topic then it's allowed to wander wherever it wants.

Tom Clifton
03-26-2012, 05:59 PM
I can't imagine ...extruded into a thin 12" wide ribbon and then pressed and vacuumed/ sucked out of the ribbon. How that could have been 3 layers of 2 types of glasses is beyond me....

One word - Elves. They live in the furnace. In a brilliant act of industrial espionage they stole that particular technology from Keebler, then went after the Oreo company for their creamy middle, hence the three layers.

Pete VanderLaan
03-26-2012, 06:30 PM
You mean there's a difference between Corning batch and Corning stock?

Cecil McKenzie
03-26-2012, 06:36 PM
http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=glw&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

Tom Clifton
03-26-2012, 07:20 PM
Corning 5 Year (http://finance.yahoo.com/echarts?s=GLW+Interactive#chart1:symbol=glw;range= 5y;indicator=volume;charttype=line;crosshair=on;oh lcvalues=0;logscale=on;source=undefined) History is a telling story...

Greg Vriethoff
03-26-2012, 10:52 PM
I love watching threads disintegrate right before my eyes.

Pete VanderLaan
03-27-2012, 06:46 AM
The thread was well over a year old. Just go back and look at the dates. The question Franklin asked after a year was whether the Studio at Corning used Corning batch. The answer was "No". Then we simply moved on.

Randy Kaltenbach
03-27-2012, 08:17 AM
Wandering threads? You never talked to old people before? And besides that, when I was young we didn't even have batch. Sand mixed with horse crap, I tell you!

Pete VanderLaan
03-27-2012, 08:29 AM
when I was young we waited for meteorites to hit the planet's surface and melted that!

Ben Solwitz
03-27-2012, 07:51 PM
I read it in the wiki article a few years ago Tom, didn't know anything about the CR stuff.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrex

Ben Solwitz
03-27-2012, 07:56 PM
It seems to be telling the same story as the s&p500 except for the last nine months or so.

glw and gspc (http://finance.yahoo.com/echarts?s=GLW+Interactive#chart1:symbol=glw;range= 5y;compare=^gspc;indicator=volume;charttype=line;c rosshair=on;ohlcvalues=0;logscale=on;source=undefi ned)

I bought some a few weeks ago.

Pete VanderLaan
03-28-2012, 05:20 AM
I read it in the wiki article a few years ago Tom, didn't know anything about the CR stuff.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrex
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So the article says that pyrex was composed as follows:

Older clear-glass Pyrex manufactured by Corning before 1998, Arc International's Pyrex products, and Pyrex laboratory glassware (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laboratory_glassware) is made of borosilicate glass. According to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Institute_of_Standards_and_Technology), borosilicate Pyrex is composed of (as percentage of weight): 14% boron (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boron), 51% oxygen (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxygen), .3% sodium (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium), 1% aluminium (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminium), 38% silicon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicon), and less than 1% potassium (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potassium).[9] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrex#cite_note-8)[10] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrex#cite_note-9)
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Now either I am getting really stupid or something is wrong with this picture. Either is possible. Oxygen? 51%? Really? My formulations for Pyrex, or Duran always showed the silicon content at about 80%. What am I missing here?

Pete VanderLaan
03-28-2012, 05:24 AM
It seems to be telling the same story as the s&p500 except for the last nine months or so.

glw and gspc (http://finance.yahoo.com/echarts?s=GLW+Interactive#chart1:symbol=glw;range= 5y;compare=%5Egspc;indicator=volume;charttype=line ;crosshair=on;ohlcvalues=0;logscale=on;source=unde fined)

I bought some a few weeks ago.
*******
You are right. I'm glad I only have VISA, which has been really good of late.

Cecil McKenzie
03-28-2012, 06:51 AM
Oxides of silicon ( silica) probably contain oxygen.

Pete VanderLaan
03-28-2012, 08:02 AM
well, I understand that. If you look at the next paragraph the next formula is 80-81 percent silica as opposed to 38 percent.

Hugh Jenkins
03-28-2012, 04:30 PM
Strange that one formula is in element percentages and the other is in oxide percentages, but I think that explains the difference in numbers.

Pete VanderLaan
03-28-2012, 05:45 PM
we should make the argument that over half of glass is just hot air. I have never seen it represented that way.

Greg Vriethoff
03-31-2012, 05:45 PM
The thread was well over a year old. Just go back and look at the dates.
Damn my eyes. Maybe I do need reading glasses after all.