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Art Ciccotti
05-16-2011, 01:27 PM
I am wondering if there is a coating for the surface of sanblasted glass. I noticed that when the surfaces of my vessels are wet they show the color so much better. Thanks in advance.
Art Ciccotti

Justin Zotynia
05-16-2011, 03:08 PM
Theirs a product out their called liquid luster very durable and holds up

David Patchen
05-16-2011, 03:49 PM
Search for this--there are a ton of discussions on it.

Ed Slawson
05-16-2011, 07:03 PM
We have been using Renaissance Wax on sandblasted, and acid etched glass for many years now. Many of my pieces are also heavily electroformed, and the Renaissance Wax stops the copper or silver from tarnishing for years. On the glass, it gives a very smooth satin texture that does not show fingerprints... great for when customers handle a piece of work.

It is produced by a London-based company Picreator Enterprises Ltd. Just do a search on eBay for "Renaissance Wax."

Robert Mickelsen
05-16-2011, 07:45 PM
Metal sculptors use a great product called Permalac for preserving the finish of patinated surfaces. I use it for that, but also for my sandblasted surfaces. Crystal clear, very durable, and thin so that it retains the etched nature of the blasted surface while allowing the colors to come out. When I run out of Permalac, Min-wax hi-gloss lacquer works too.

Kenny Pieper
05-16-2011, 07:48 PM
All that stuff is great but not permanent. Acid is the only way to make a satin finish that will last. Its dangerious

Art Ciccotti
05-17-2011, 03:04 PM
Thanks everyone for the information. I don't think I will try the acid polishing at least no plans in the near future for doing so. I agree HF is dangerous stuff.
Art Ciccotti

Travis Frink
05-19-2011, 08:35 AM
I have used fire polishing and pumice on a hose hair brush wheel (not sure what the proper englsh name is). They take the roughness off and give a smooth finish that doesn't show fingerprints like a fresh sanded surface.

A friend uses #400 and a toothbrush to smoothe the insides of sandblasted vessels (maybe the outsides too). I am sure there is a lot of room for improvement on this but it works. As an extension of this, I have used wet sandpaper and a little #400 and water on lips and insides of sanded vessels too. After an hour plus in the hotshop, +\-10 minutes of coldwork for a nice finish isn't a lot.

David Patchen
12-21-2011, 09:41 PM
Just tried minwax polyurathane and it seems pretty excellent. At $5 a small can it's a whole lot more affordable than liquid lustr.

Pete VanderLaan
12-22-2011, 10:18 AM
Polyurethanes will yellow in the sun.

David Hopman
12-22-2011, 01:59 PM
Hand sanding the sandblasted surface with 400 diamond gives a much nicer finish.

Kier Lugo
12-22-2011, 07:40 PM
ya, i think i do remember a previous thread about this. i think acid is the nicest and most permanent, but always be careful for you, others and the environment when using chemicals. i think the word "acid" automaticly turns a lot of people off ( although i guess it turned a lot of people on in the 60's:) ).

other than acid one thing that i know of that looks most like acid etch and doesn't have a plasticky sheen to it like some other products is a spray can of silicone lubricant like what you would find at home depot probably. you spray it on and then immediately wipe it off and rub it in with a cotton cloth like a t-shirt.

Kier Lugo
12-22-2011, 07:48 PM
oh, there is one other thing that i have seen but never tied because it seemed like extra work plus a higher chance of failure than other ways. i've seen some people sand blast there finished piece and then bring it back up to 1000 i would imagine. then after it has soaked for a bit re punti it and give it a few good flashes in the glory hole and then re anneal it. if done right the heat will soften out the edges from sand blasting creating the softer acid etched look with out the more white frosted look and fingerprint issue of sand blasting. probably not a good way to go if you have a bunch of pieces that will be requiring this look.

David Patchen
03-22-2013, 02:53 PM
I dusted off this thread since I'm testing mineral oil with good results so far. Of course it's not super-permanent but seems like a nice finish that would be easy for a client to refresh if it needed it. Super easy to apply and after wiping it off leaves a nice satin matte finish. Yes, your hands get a bit of oil on them when you pickup the piece, but its strangely not that slippery of an oil.

Anyone else try this? Long term results?

Kenny Pieper
03-22-2013, 04:00 PM
I dusted off this thread since I'm testing mineral oil with good results so far. Of course it's not super-permanent but seems like a nice finish that would be easy for a client to refresh if it needed it. Super easy to apply and after wiping it off leaves a nice satin matte finish. Yes, your hands get a bit of oil on them when you pickup the piece, but its strangely not that slippery of an oil.

Anyone else try this? Long term results?

Many years ago I use to use Armor All. It would last about a year

Doug Randall
03-22-2013, 04:23 PM
I use Armor-all since my clients can easily obtain it to "reshine" the work every so often. I still prefer the look of warm baby oil though.

Guy Kass
03-22-2013, 04:30 PM
"One discovered by Jeff Wright, Unelko's shower sealer gel. You rub a very little of it onto the piece with a lint-free rag and work it in. It'll start out with a glossy shine that fades into a softer finish in a couple of weeks. It brings the color back to the glass without needing constant renewal."

David Hopman
03-22-2013, 11:26 PM
"One discovered by Jeff Wright, Unelko's shower sealer gel. You rub a very little of it onto the piece with a lint-free rag and work it in. It'll start out with a glossy shine that fades into a softer finish in a couple of weeks. It brings the color back to the glass without needing constant renewal."

I use this and love it.

http://www.unelko.com/store/product.php?productid=16146

Paul Wheeler
03-23-2013, 09:38 AM
I use this and love it.

http://www.unelko.com/store/product.php?productid=16146

David, how long does this treatment last assuming regular (weekly) cleanings?
-Paul

David Hopman
03-23-2013, 01:11 PM
David, how long does this treatment last assuming regular (weekly) cleanings?
-Paul

I'm trying to think of the last time I recoated anything in the gallery and am drawing a blank. A year at least, probably longer. I have a very old building with a leaky roof, one piece was under a drip for a year and the water still beaded off.

One annoying thing is that price tags will not stick.

Jeff Wright
04-01-2013, 12:03 PM
I have a piece that has been "treated" with the Unelko Tub and Shower Cleaner stuff about 4 years ago. It still seems to be holding up just fine. I dust it off once in a while with a soft cloth. I don't handle the pieces a lot, but I still don't see any signs of fingerprints.