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Rick Sherbert
11-26-2011, 07:55 AM
Hey all,

I seem to be having trouble searching the forum for "safety glasses". I remember a discussion, but can't find it. Anyway...

I know about Aura Lens and I don't want to get into a discussion about them, but I was wondering who knows about other places to get perscription safety glasses that will block IR and give me a little shade.

?

Rick

Brett A. Young
11-26-2011, 09:37 AM
Here are a couple of sites that have what you are looking for.


http://www.phillips-safety.com/store/index.php?cPath=40_155_61

http://www.dichroicimagery.com/index.php?cPath=433_17_257_258_264

Brett

Pringle Teetor
11-26-2011, 04:05 PM
thanks - i have given up on Aura Lens and am looking for glasses as well.....

Michael Mortara
11-26-2011, 08:36 PM
http://www.noir-medical.com/pdf/NoIRMedicalCatalog.pdf

These guys specialize in IR blocking for lasers and such, the clip on's are about $45 and come in al types of color/shades. I've been told to watch out for didymium as it is not great for IR

David Patchen
11-26-2011, 10:25 PM
check out safetyglassesusa.com and search for "IR". Lots of good options below $10.

Andrew Boatman
12-06-2011, 11:00 AM
My local eyeglass shop does a lot of prescription safety glasses for welding. They use a bosh and lome (spelling?) product.

Thomas Chapman
12-06-2011, 06:59 PM
Bausch & Lomb

John Ruzsa
05-04-2014, 03:20 PM
I called Aura lens five times, waited over 2 months, over 300 bucks for my prescription, they finally show up, and the lenses are two different colors!

Sky Campbell
05-04-2014, 03:25 PM
I called Aura lens five times, waited over 2 months, over 300 bucks for my prescription, they finally show up, and the lenses are two different colors!

Are they split lens being top one shade and the bottom the other or are you saying two different Lens from left to right?

John Ruzsa
05-04-2014, 03:55 PM
My right lens 30% darker than the left when viewed with ordinary white paper behind. My prescription not that different from one eye to the other.....

Pete VanderLaan
05-04-2014, 04:45 PM
Well, now you can play pirate. I really don't know what happened to Mike. It's certainly not possible to recommend Aura as a source anymore.

Sky Campbell
05-04-2014, 06:03 PM
Wow that's really bad. I know Mike went through a bunch of drama but from what I've been hearing he's trying to pull it together. I don't think that's acceptable at all how long has it been? I certainly wouldn't settle for that. Obviously someone screwed up. Welding filters and suppliers have been spotty and I know Mike just found a new source. Maybe you got stuck in the middle.

Eben Horton
05-05-2014, 03:59 PM
What's the deal with the best type of glasses to use anyway? I have a pair of didymium sand my girlfriend has a pair of welding glasses. She was told by an optimologist that welding glasses were best... I disagree.

Pete VanderLaan
05-05-2014, 04:05 PM
For torchwork you need the neodymium lense to damp down the UV and sodium flame and in some cases, the IR. I do not know why they call that Didymium. There is no such element. . For furnace work a number three welders lens is more than sufficient. Any darker and you'll get lost in the studio. Mike used to tell me that ordinary glasses were actually quite adequate in normal furnace work. Your eyes have no nerve ends that can sense heat but they still get burned so a simple reflective surface like clear glass handles most stuff.

David Patchen
05-05-2014, 04:22 PM
There seems to be so much misinformation about this issue. As I understand it, as furnace workers, unless you're running your glory hole as hot as the sun, we're not exposed to that much dangerous IR. We definitely don't need anything that cuts sodium flare like didymium since we don't sit in front of a oxy/propane torch for hours. So why the fancy dark glasses?

Before I understood the above I bought an expensive pair of #3 welding shades to blow glass but they were crazy dark and I think totally unnecessary. Now I use them as sunglasses when I walk to the local taqueria to grab lunch.

The glasses I've settled on use block 75% of IR, 99% of UVA and UVB, are super light, are fairly light colored and cost....drumroll...$10.65. If you'd prefer to spend $200 so you feel you're really protecting your eyes, feel free to send me a check and I'll send you a half dozen of these glasses. The balance is my fee.

Or get them here: http://www.safetyglassesusa.com/s25arcs.html

Pete VanderLaan
05-05-2014, 05:40 PM
The problem mainly exists for people who need prescription lenses. That's when the consumer protection division has monkeys in the sacred temple. It's a sales project to get people to buy what they really don't need.

Sky Campbell
05-05-2014, 06:27 PM
Didymium (Greek: twin element) is a mixture of the elements praseodymium and neodymium.

I use a shade 2.5 from the same safetyglassesusa. They had a yellow lens that was rated to a 2 welding shade that I loved but they don't carry them anymore.

Jon Myers
05-07-2014, 11:25 AM
We have had nothing but good luck with Aura Lens... I'm suprised to hear people are having problems. We've ordered and received a half dozen pair of glasses in the last couple of months a couple of them repairs from dropping them etc and they were all as ordered and prompt...

Pete VanderLaan
05-07-2014, 12:25 PM
Didymium (Greek: twin element) is a mixture of the elements praseodymium and neodymium.

I use a shade 2.5 from the same safetyglassesusa. They had a yellow lens that was rated to a 2 welding shade that I loved but they don't carry them anymore.
***********
It would have to be a profoundly tiny amount of praseodymium then. Last time I bought lenses, Neodymium was about $8.00 lb and Praseodymium was $2,500.00 lb. Both have gone up. I think that the word is used but not the actual compound.

As to the issues with Aura. Initially I discounted the complaints but we sure have had a bunch of them. You can't help but notice.

Sky Campbell
05-07-2014, 03:49 PM
Interesting read from what I gathered.
Didymium was once thought to be an element and was given the DI. Then it was discovered it is actually two elements combined.

So how could that be did someone make it then die with the secret. Later to be closely examined and found to be two elements?

I also wonder if you just had a lens of neodymium would it work the same. All research leads me to more questions them answers.

So maybe someone could let Mike know we have unanswered questions and some costumer problems. I would love to hear what Mike knows of this mysterious mixture. I would also love to see Mike make more happy customers. I have at least a dozen pairs of his filters and really can't say anything but good things personally.

Pete VanderLaan
05-07-2014, 03:57 PM
When I was 18, a long time ago, they called these things Neodymium. At that time, the technology did not exist to do certain separations and Neodymium was really expensive. Then, it became a byproduct of another process and the same thing happened to Selenium and the price fell. At one time I paid $4.50 lb for Selenium. Praseodymium has always been really rare in reality and very difficult to process, thus the high cost.

While I would love to hear from Mike since the best thing to combat bad press is by being honest about the issues, I think that the lens are neodymium and neodymium only, or an ever so tiny portion of praseodymium they just couldn't extract from the compound.

The only thing I know there is that there were some serious health issues for a family member. I do not know more.

Jacqueline Knight
05-10-2014, 11:15 PM
http://www.artcoinc.com/phillips_safety.php

http://www.waleapparatus.com/index.asp?category=25401

Artco sells the 'reader' glasses if they're at all appropriate.

Pete VanderLaan
05-11-2014, 12:22 PM
The main issue has always been getting them in a prescription

John Riepma
05-11-2014, 12:49 PM
Which brings up the question in my mind - is it a coating or a tint in the actual lens material? If it's a coating it sure would be nice to get it done to a prescription pair that you already have, and if it's the lens material is it only available through one supplier? That almost doesn't seem possible.

Pete VanderLaan
05-11-2014, 01:03 PM
Hoya makes a lot of Neodymium glass. Schott used to do a lot but they had not been able to underbid Hoya for years.I have a lot of neodymium slab glass as in 100's of pounds. It all is like 2x12"s three feet long.

I have not bought lenses in thirty years. They used to all be glass and for me were quite heavy. If they're plastic, it isn't neodymium doped anyway or I certainly don't know how that would be done.

John Riepma
05-11-2014, 06:18 PM
Polyvitro? (couldn't resist...)

Steven O'Day
05-11-2014, 08:35 PM
I use g-15 lenses from Ray Ban, they are lighter shade than the welding #3 and have good color. They are made to block IR and can be made in prescription. In furnace work the IR is a risk factor for cataracts, not nerve damage.

from: Infrared radiation and cataract (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6091398)

The study was undertaken to determine if occupational exposure to infrared (IR) radiation increases the risk of developing cataract. The study includes epidemiologic investigations of two groups of workers exposed to IR radiation and two groups of non IR-exposed controls. The first investigation included 208 iron and steel workers and 208 controls. For each of the workers, the lifetime IR-exposure was calculated with the help of occupational interviews and measurements of the IR-exposure to their eyes in their jobs. Eye examinations including a detailed slit lamp examination of the lens were made. Exposed persons and controls were examined randomly. Wedge shaped opacities, a common type of senile lens opacity, were found in 32% of IR-exposed workers 60 years and older and in 12% of controls of the same age. In younger age groups there was no significant difference between exposed and controls regarding the presence of lens opacities. The second investigation included 209 IR-exposed glass workers and 298 controls. Workers over 50 years of age and with at least 20 years of occupational IR-exposure were included. Special care was taken to include retired workers. Exposure determinations and ophthalmological examinations were made in the same way as in the first study. The eye examinations of the glass workers showed that 16% of glass workers over 70 years of age had been operated for cataract compared to 1% of controls of the same age. In neither of the two studies was it possible to detect a dose-effect correlation. The exposure measurements showed that the maximal doses in both the iron and the glass industry are about the same. There are, however, a large number of jobs in the iron and steel industry that give low doses while most jobs in the glass works give high exposures. Cataract was found to be more common in the left than in the right eye. Measurements of the exposure to the two eyes separately also showed that the left eye in some working moments is exposed to higher irradiances than the right. A family history of cataract was found to increase the risk for the development of cataract in glass workers.

Lia Howe
05-11-2014, 11:16 PM
I went to my regular eyeglass guy. I brought him a pair of welders 3. He made me regular prescription glasses ( to my scrip of course) and then cut the welders down to fit the sunglass flip-up attachment. I now have my regular prescription glasses to see other things in the studio ( like what colour is in that bowl?) and then I have flip-ups in welders green. Have even had to change the scrip. of the clear glass. No problem and they cost me $30.00 to have the welder greens made in the flip-ups. Maybe it is a small town thing but he worked with me to do this. I have also learned that he has made them for others.

David Patchen
05-12-2014, 12:37 AM
"Glass worker" is not defined sufficiently. We're they melting batch in a factory setting? Flame working? Scientific glassblowers (also flame working), neon? Studio glass offhand furnace work? Lots of different situations.

Pete VanderLaan
05-12-2014, 07:11 AM
In those studies they inevitably mean flameworkers, every time. The IR is blocked by the welders lens. Sodium flare, an issue for lampworkers is blocked by the neodymium lens. If the lampworkers product is large enough, they may need IR protection as well but as Mike pointed out to me many times, your regular prescription glasses deflect the IR anyways. The person at greatest risk is the person who needs no corrective lenses at all and has direct exposure. Glass does a better job of deflection than plastic.

Lia, you are fortunate. At this point, all of the quick lens in one hour places are owned by the same Italian company and the price is rigged. It's why your frames can easily cost three hundred dollars now. Monopoly.

Eben Horton
05-12-2014, 09:18 AM
about the glass worker study.. they might mean furnace workers for this one fact.. 99% of glass workers who stand at the glory hole do so with their left side facing the hole. ;)

something to consider.

do neodymium glasses block IR?

Steven O'Day
05-12-2014, 10:44 AM
I found another paper from the same researcher. It looks like the study is about furnace workers. Interesting about the glory hole link, I find that my hearing loss is greater in my left ear, I always assumed it was from the higher noise at the hole.

Infrared radiation and cataract II. Epidemiologic investigation of glass workers. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6524322)

An epidemiologic investigation on the prevalence of cataract in glass workers is presented. The study includes 209 workers over 50 years of age exposed to infrared (IR) radiation in the Swedish manual glass industry for 20 years or more, and 298 non-IR-exposed controls. The examination includes an evaluation of the individual IR-exposure and an ophthalmological examination with special reference to the lens. In IR-exposed workers 70 years of age and older there is a statistically significant increase of aphakia and of all types of cataract, subcapsular, cuneiform and nuclear, compared to the controls of the same age group. In the same age group the risk for an IR-exposed worker to have his vision reduced by cataract to 0.7 or less is 2.5 times as high as for non-exposed controls (95% confidence interval 1.4-4.4). The risk that he will have to be operated for cataract is 12 times as high (95% confidence interval 2.6-53). It is concluded, that the occupational IR-exposure of the glass workers accelerates the development of senile changes in the lens. All workers with a high exposure to IR radiation should be equipped with adequate eye protection.

Steven O'Day
05-12-2014, 10:49 AM
If you want an even more stylish (costly) option, Revo makes a glass lens that works as well as the G-15 and can be made in prescription. It has to be put in their frames though.

Pete VanderLaan
05-12-2014, 11:51 AM
well, I stand corrected about the furnace worker vs flame worker issue. I am however deaf in my right ear.. I think Eben's point is a good one. No where do I see study of people simply wearing regular old glasses though.

Dave Hilty
05-12-2014, 12:15 PM
Which brings up the question in my mind - is it a coating or a tint in the actual lens material? If it's a coating it sure would be nice to get it done to a prescription pair that you already have, and if it's the lens material is it only available through one supplier? That almost doesn't seem possible.

I remember reading here a post from Mike (back in the day) that the reason you can't produce plastic lenses with Didymium or Neodymium is that the material had to be introduced into a glass body and couldn't be applied as a coating.

Steven O'Day
05-12-2014, 12:37 PM
Pete you have a good point about the limitations of this study. It was published in 1984. It does not look at what type of protection if any the workers were using and how this may have changed over time.

Glass by itself will block a lot of the IR, glass that is formulated to block IR is even better. Plastic by itself will not block IR. In the lens industry UV protection is the focus, IR is a specialty covered mostly by the welding lenses. As always glass workers are such a small market no one pays them much attention.

Pete VanderLaan
05-12-2014, 01:25 PM
I remember reading here a post from Mike (back in the day) that the reason you can't produce plastic lenses with Didymium or Neodymium is that the material had to be introduced into a glass body and couldn't be applied as a coating.
********

Well, as I said, I have these 2x12 inch by 36 inch slabs of it just waiting to become your fashion statement. Maybe if Elton John became a glassblower?
Anyone who has plastic lenses they believe to be "di" Dymium is being sold abill of goods.

David Patchen
05-12-2014, 01:31 PM
I'll wear my $10 lenses that block 75% IR and keep my fingers crossed I don't need cataract surgery. But both my folks had cataracts (they had surgery) and they never took a gather once, so there might be surgery in my future no matter what lenses I wear.

Kenny Pieper
05-12-2014, 03:27 PM
A week from today (monday) I am going to have caterack surgery on my right eye. I have been blowing for 37 years and most of that time have used protection of some kind. In the earley years it was dymium but later when I needed prescription glasses it was just them and #3 welding glass in front of the gloryhole. Doc. doesn't think glassblowing is the cause but who knows.

My favorite piece of equipment in the shop is a heat-shield in front of the gloryhole that has a #3 welding window mounted in it. When I work in shops that don't' have something like that it really wares me out.

Pete VanderLaan
05-12-2014, 04:01 PM
I have this stupid glassblower thing I'm going to have to build. How about polishing both sides of a 12x18 inch piece of the 2 inch thick neodymium slab and mounting it in a heat shield? Or worse, build an entire wall out of it. Mary beth Hates it when I put the stuff into a sculpture.

Sorry to hear the surgery has finally come Kenny. All I've got is Glaucoma. But the heart stuff is what will probably toast me anyways.

Tom Bloyd
05-12-2014, 04:20 PM
I went to the eye doctor about 5 years ago for a piece of metal in my eye. She got that out and then said: "See you in ten years for that cataract you've got going."

Kenny Pieper
05-12-2014, 04:52 PM
[QUOTE=Pete VanderLaan;118909]I have this stupid glassblower thing I'm going to have to build. How about polishing both sides of a 12x18 inch piece of the 2 inch thick neodymium slab and mounting it in a heat shield?

It will crack!
I put a piece of boro glass in front of my welding glass to protect it from the heat.

Pete VanderLaan
05-12-2014, 06:20 PM
How about a heat shield done in 1/4 plate with a dead air space?

Tom Bloyd
05-12-2014, 08:56 PM
better yet just have your assistant take your reheats.

Eben Horton
05-12-2014, 09:20 PM
The worst thing one can do is wear dark cheap sunglasses. It opens up your iris and lets in all the bad stuff... Uv, IR, etc. I'm embarrassed to say that I am just now wearing glasses after 25 years of wearing nothing.

Kenny Pieper
05-13-2014, 08:42 AM
How about a heat shield done in 1/4 plate with a dead air space?

Thats what I have done for years. You can by aluminum double pane window channel and put a clear pane towards the glorhole but it often cracks. Thats why I used boro on the current one. Its been in use for 12 years now.

Ted Trower
05-13-2014, 10:10 AM
Didn't someone once suggest using an old oven window for this job?

Pete VanderLaan
05-13-2014, 10:17 AM
I have some sheets of Isenglass that are quite large but I really like the wretched excess notion of putting in the two inch thick Neo, looming large. I do think a piece of 1.4 plate on the hot face with deadair would keep the slab from being destroyed. It's just a dumb fun project stupid glassblower trick. Two inch thick would certainly stop the IR issue. I have some 48% radiation shielding glass thats really thick too. Piss yellow. I hate the color. Really gross if you use the neo with it.

Dave Hilty
05-13-2014, 03:57 PM
I have a not unrelated question: Often, during the winter and then again just the other day, someone will invariably say to me "Hey how'd you get so much sun? Your face looks tanned."

The only thing I can figure is hanging out in front of the GH is emitting enough UV to give me a slight tan. Anyone else got an opinion. Maybe I need to wear sunblock when I'm in the studio.

Jim Vormelker
05-21-2014, 05:22 PM
The newest thing with cataract removal is not so new that Medicare won't cover it. So just wait till you're eligible....

It's a computer enhanced operation. Takes about 10 min per eye. Smaller incision. The cataract is blasted with ultrasound until is shatters, then it's sucked out. Then a replacement lens, with correction, is inserted through the same incision.

You leave an hour after you got there. and use sheet plastic dark lenses inside your regular prescription, only because you'er dialated big time. It'll be a bit fuzzy the first evening and next morning, then normal vision. NO prolonged opaque covering.

And the kicker is that you don't have to wait for them to 'ripen' to get big enough for the surgeon to get a hold of. In fact, they want them as early as they can get them.

I was amazed at how white white became... and how much yellow I had been compensating for before the surgery.