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Franklin Sankar
01-23-2012, 08:09 AM
Anybody read this book?

Glassblowing a Search for Form - Harvey Littleton; Paperback

any book review?
Franklin

Lawrence Ruskin
01-23-2012, 10:27 AM
It's a re-issue of one of the first books on glassblowing.

It has some insights into the Rosy dawn of the studio glass movement.

This was the time when benches and pretty much everything else was made with the bones of mastodons.

Josh Bernbaum
01-23-2012, 10:44 AM
Franklin, I have a copy of the this, found it in a used book store.
I'd recommend it for the photos if nothing else. Of particular interest to me was to see the equipment that they used. There's a shot of a glory hole that had less insulation than some of my T shirts do.

Franklin Sankar
01-23-2012, 05:16 PM
Thanks. Sounds like good history from t.hem good old days.
Franklin

Dave Hilty
01-23-2012, 06:13 PM
Harvey wrestles with the artistic challenges and the "happy accident" versus working to a strict design drawn in advance. This book is a good discussion of what glass art is as well as the technical stuff. Some lovely pix of Art Nouveau and many other photos of his early works and that of others he respected.

Dan Ellis
01-23-2012, 11:12 PM
video about Harvey Littleton

http://vimeo.com/27570422

Drew Jaeger
01-24-2012, 09:09 AM
That is a good video. For someone like me who has come to the glassblowing game very recently (about 4 years ago) it's really nice to see where it came from. It's nice to hear the voices and see the faces of the people I can thank for getting the whole thing started.

Pete VanderLaan
01-24-2012, 06:50 PM
Find the book by Frank Kulasiewicz I know I have this spelled wrong). Henry absolutely ripped it to shreds at the time. it was actually pretty interesting stuff and had formulas for leaded glasses in 1973.

Lawrence is right about the technical content of Harvey's book. We were all pretty innocent at the time.

Tom Fuhrman
01-24-2012, 07:32 PM
Thanks goodness Frank actually did it. It may not have been totally correct or limited in some ways but before that there was nothing. Schools didn't offer much if anything and info was distributed via word of mouth and Fritz and his travels. I couldn't get into any college programs in 1970 because I already had a B.S. and grad programs were virtually non existant. Peiser had only been at Penland for a couple of years and it was difficult to find anything but Frank's book.

Henry Halem
01-24-2012, 09:50 PM
I was Harvey's assistant at the time he was trying to write his book. He had just fired his editor and was at loose ends as to how to put his book together. Sandy my wife became his editor as she was a researcher and writer. She took all his random notes and writings and put the book together. I was charged with taking all his photographs and preparing them for reproduction. It was quite a job. As far as Kulachawitz's (sp) book is concerned I felt his advice on building furnaces and burners was very dangerous even for the those early times. We had come further than that. Yes there was nothing in print but his something was, IMO, selling and explosive situation.

Franklin Sankar
01-25-2012, 06:50 AM
Everyone will agree that this board is priceless. It it is heavy on the technique and hardware side. I have long ago realised that if you want to call yourself an artist and worst of all a glass artist you have to know what is art. In those early days, how did you all manage with the development of a new unique creature called a glass artist.
I can well imaging your creativity developing a design in glass but there was no technique to make it. Or was there? What kind of discussion did you have when you meet. Perhaps by chance in the loo when you had the full attention of a developing glass artist at his most creative moment. What did you reference you art to? Murano??
Were there any ladies involved then. No, not with you, but with the glass.
Franklin

Henry Halem
01-25-2012, 08:46 AM
Come to my illustrated talk in Tucson on March 8 Franklin. I cover what you're asking. Yes there were "ladies" involved.

Dave Bross
01-25-2012, 10:21 AM
The glass menagerie?

Ol' Tennessee would have loved the drama.

Franklin Sankar
01-25-2012, 11:09 AM
Tell them to put it on line the world would like to know.
Franklin

Dave Hilty
01-25-2012, 11:59 AM
Kulachawitz's (sp) .

Kulasiewicz

Another book published in the same year (1974) is Studio Glassmaking by Ray Flavell & Claude Smale, more about technique than how to build a studio .

Pete VanderLaan
01-25-2012, 04:23 PM
I was Harvey's assistant at the time he was trying to write his book. He had just fired his editor and was at loose ends as to how to put his book together. Sandy my wife became his editor as she was a researcher and writer. She took all his random notes and writings and put the book together. I was charged with taking all his photographs and preparing them for reproduction. It was quite a job. As far as Kulachawitz's (sp) book is concerned I felt his advice on building furnaces and burners was very dangerous even for the those early times. We had come further than that. Yes there was nothing in print but his something was, IMO, selling and explosive situation.
***********

I can't disagree that Frank's equipment installations made one's heart beat faster but overall, that was a very positive book on doing it outside of the school environment which as Tom pointed out was viewed at the time as the only acceptable path to glass nirvana.

Pete VanderLaan
01-25-2012, 05:14 PM
Everyone will agree that this board is priceless. It it is heavy on the technique and hardware side. I have long ago realised that if you want to call yourself an artist and worst of all a glass artist you have to know what is art. In those early days, how did you all manage with the development of a new unique creature called a glass artist.
I can well imaging your creativity developing a design in glass but there was no technique to make it. Or was there? What kind of discussion did you have when you meet. Perhaps by chance in the loo when you had the full attention of a developing glass artist at his most creative moment. What did you reference you art to? Murano??
Were there any ladies involved then. No, not with you, but with the glass.
Franklin

*************
Well there were lots of pissing contests that's for sure. Why the term "Artist" had to be qualified with "Glass" was always sort a sign of insecurity to me. How many "Bronze Artists" have you heard of? The Art community as I recall did not view the notion of glass being an artists material at all and they certainly did not want any more people trying to share the sales in a fairly small pool.

Dale should really be credited with successfully pushing the gallery and museum community into recognizing glass as a fine art material. He was relentless in that pursuit and was truly standing away from the crowd at the time pointing in a very different direction than "Glassblowers are the Truck Drivers of the Art World". Dale didn't want Tie Dye, he wanted buff and waxed. Image was very important to him, God knows I listened to him talking about it enough.

After Peiser's sale of the Wisteria piece in 1977 at Heller, the dollar race was on and things truly changed overnight. Fritz was dead on when he said "Money changed Everything". Tie dye vanished. Dale went to see the Marketer. People no longer would be called "Dick". It would become "Richard", or "Charles". Billy became "William". Photography became critical. Who you associated with was important. Not a fun time to just like the stuff. .

Sandy Dukeshire
01-27-2012, 10:15 PM
Tell them to put it on line the world would like to know.
Franklin


yesyesyes pleasepleaseplease