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Josh Bernbaum
02-09-2012, 07:08 AM
Hi everyone,

I'm finally getting around to making the second bench for my shop, and this time I would like to include one of those "bump-outs" for your right hip/leg so it's less pressure there on your body when you're reaching out while working on longer pieces.

Wondering if some of you may be so kind as to post a photo or two so I can get some ideas on design.

Thanks in advance!

Josh B

Rob Williams
02-09-2012, 08:16 AM
Josh,

I think there are 2 designs in glass notes for benches; one of them has a cut out for leaning out further called the lino design.
There are some good images on the web that one could 'reverse engineer' if you’re very spatially aware.
One -> http://www.nwironworks.com/benches.htm (http://www.nwironworks.com/benches.htm)
Two -> http://www.ohmequipment.com/accesories.html (http://www.ohmequipment.com/accesories.html)
Three -> Google image search for glass blowing benches.

I just built one a few weeks ago and the biggest controversy was whether or not to put an angle on the arms so a pipe would roll slowly to the end stops on its own. We chose to, with some ridicule from others. Anyone have thoughts on this?

Another was how to design the right rail stopper that is next to your ribs, without causing a punctured lung. We just skipped that. We already had a pipe end up in their lap, so that will need fixed too.


Good luck!

Pete VanderLaan
02-09-2012, 09:22 AM
My bench rolls away and it has to. I work alone and if you ever want to work alone, it helps to know where your work is going to be when at rest. The rail on the right only comes up about halfway compared to the one on the left. That way there is never a rail in the way when I want to grab tools, or to lean out. I have also placed a pair or rolling wheels froma a skate in each rail at the very end so I can rotate a piece without actually having it move away or towards me. It's very handy for threading.

Michael Mccain
02-09-2012, 02:31 PM
I like the benches they make out there in Arizona. Beefy tube stock, the Z keeps heavy work from tipping the bench, along with a bucket shelf welded in back. Plus the handy slide-out feature, if you can go without a panty shield. Slap some height adjusters on to level in any situation, and some wheels just off the floor in the corners to dolly it around, cuz its heavy.

Paul Hayworth
02-09-2012, 03:07 PM
Red Lead prices in USA for a drum Drumhttp://www.fotolibra.com/gallery/655898/glassworks-furnace-uk-1970/http://www.fotolibra.com/gallery/706195/whitefriars-glass-works-uk-1970/

David Russell
02-09-2012, 08:08 PM
my bench has welded nuts on the legs with heavy duty bolts for the feet that can be adjusted to have the bench slope some or none. obviously nothing fancy but quite versitile for different work, i also work alone so many days the slope is needed but for some delicate work, a few turns of the wrench and your back to level.

David Patchen
02-09-2012, 09:38 PM
I like the benches they make out there in Arizona. Beefy tube stock, the Z keeps heavy work from tipping the bench, along with a bucket shelf welded in back. Plus the handy slide-out feature, if you can go without a panty shield. Slap some height adjusters on to level in any situation, and some wheels just off the floor in the corners to dolly it around, cuz its heavy.

Yikes. My right leg would be cooked in a second without a shield in the bench.

Rahman Anderson
02-09-2012, 09:46 PM
I am in Ohio so cannot send a pic. The old spiral arts style with nice and useful bends in round stock. Most important things are the height from the floor and the distance from seat to rail. A good bench is rare. Maybe Jordan will sell you one. I think he has one all made up.

Zach Jorgenson
02-09-2012, 10:30 PM
Yikes. My right leg would be cooked in a second without a shield in the bench.

You might be surprised how uncooked your leg would be, even while wearing shorts and working on big pieces. Philabaum's benches are quite functional.

David Patchen
02-09-2012, 11:05 PM
You might be surprised how uncooked your leg would be, even while wearing shorts and working on big pieces. Philabaum's benches are quite functional.

You might be surprised how large my work is. :)

Michael Ahlefeldt-Laurvig
02-10-2012, 02:33 AM
All of me would be cooked working in a sweater like that!

Michael Mccain
02-10-2012, 09:53 AM
I seen bigger

Alexander Adams
02-10-2012, 10:27 AM
Michael, my experience with those benches was quite the opposite. Part of it is what one has learned on or is used to using. My review below of those benches is in no way animosity directed at you. (we should get together at some point and have a beer or coffee. Maybe grab some other glass people from the area now that there is enough people for a community)

Ergonomics is key. One can tell how well a studio has implemented ergonomics based on the rate of repetitive stress injuries experienced by the employees. Some places have a bad track record.

I found the rails on Tom's benches to be too high. The extra big shrug (almost an olympic style clean and jerk) needed to set the pipe on or remove the pipe from the rails after a reheat was an extra step that wasted energy and added another moment where opperator error could occur. Some of that work was heavy and the added weight of the 30lb 2 person traveling yoke didn't help.

The slide out feature is good in theory but if someone is working that big, they should already be out of the bench working on the piece and have someone sitting at the bench and someone else turning. I found the dynamics at that studio prevented the management from investigating common studio practices used elsewhere to produce similar sized/weighted work. The end result was ineffective use of skilled people power. But did provide an wonderful look backward in time to see how things were done in the 80's.

With tacit knowledge, I can say that I was always acutely aware that there was a lack of a heat shield on those benches. Somewhere there is a street missing a traffic sign and my legs were all the better for it. (Lino is responsible for that sign missing thanks to his displeasure in '97)

Finally, the bench seats are incredibly high. Any higher there might as well have been an empty space to stand. I always felt like Lily Tomlin doing her Edith Ann routine sitting in those things. Maybe that's to match the gloryholes that have a center that is practically at eye level. (On a poistive note, I really like the door opening mechanisms)

If one is used to a common bench style and wants to build one with a bump-out. Take your pick of methods used to achieve the bump-out. I made one based on HUB's design (see their website). I used thick flat bar, heated it up and bent it over a template. Then I used an oversized sheat of aluminum for the shield. I clamped one side of the sheet to the front of the bench and used an Exact bench torch to anneal the aluminum making it easy to shape the aluminum over the Flat bar that is the bump-out. Shape the aluminum quickly and use your kevlar gloves. Mark the excess aluminum with a sharpie, remove extra material and fasten to your bench. You don't need much of a bump out. HUB's website has an image with a good vantage point for de-engineering. In the eastern PA region, people usually make the bump-out by bending the verticle support between the bench seat and rail and simply not worry about connecting the shield to this part of the bench. This method doesn't allow for much reach over, it keeps the shield away from wide work and while preventing your leg from being pushed into steel tube when you do reach over. Wet Dog's standard bench utilizes this design and Ohm's design is a hybred of this.

Pete VanderLaan
02-10-2012, 11:22 AM
I have to agree with Alex. I remember those benches. I remember the pastorelli and the Ferro. That was a shop for the very young, agile and strong. I remember one guy who was big and strapping almost buckling under the ferro in '97. Beefy isn't always best.

Michael Mccain
02-10-2012, 11:41 AM
Maybe its just that its a tall mans studio- being one I really liked the layout. I've had to work in shops where I'd crouch over to see in the glory and squat to sit at the bench with a rail no higher than my thigh.
Yeah Pete we need to collaborate and talk about an equipment donation/intern enlistment

Pete VanderLaan
02-10-2012, 11:47 AM
Fritz always hated my gloryhole because it was up around shoulder level. I'm 6' 1". Once I got older, I lowered it. I have less back problems now.

Jordan Kube
02-10-2012, 12:48 PM
That bench looks awful. I agree with everything Alex says as well. Here is the style I like to build. Pretty much how Fred was making them back in the day.

Lawrence Ruskin
02-10-2012, 01:12 PM
If you're a tall person and you are up and down from your bench a lot, you might give a higher bench a look, to save your back.

My bench seat comes to just a bil lower than my lovely behind, that way I'm not sitting down and getting up all the time.

The seat is padded vinyl so it's slippery.

I jump down onto a soft rubber pad which helps with the back thing as well.

Pete VanderLaan
02-10-2012, 01:58 PM
I have seen, and tried benches which arent benches at all. You just back in to rails coming out from a wall, or another way is a walk in bench. It saves your back but doesn't let you use your legs well though

David Patchen
02-10-2012, 02:57 PM
That bench looks awful. I agree with everything Alex says as well. Here is the style I like to build. Pretty much how Fred was making them back in the day.

Jordan's bench looks perfect to me. Beefy and stable is where it's at. I like the tool hanger too. I like low benches where my feet touch the floor while I"m seated, but I'm 5'7". I also like low yokes and low glory holes so you don't kill your shoulders. It's also easy to go from the bench to the yoke and vice versa w/big stuff. With a long yoke track you can get the yoke very close to the bench so your assistant just moves it over at the same height. Bump outs are good but I work off the bench for most stuff once it's on the punty. (Short guy/short arms). I love the idea of rollers built into the rails at the end of the bench--I've got to do that.

Some things I can't stand in a bench:
- Tool holding pegs off the front of the tool bench (I hit work on them a couple times and the next day busted out the angle grinder and removed them).
- Legs that aren't stable for large, heavy stuff.
- Short width makes a bench unstable when your assistant leans on it or puts down a heavy piece.
- Too tall makes me crazy. We have a tall guy bench here where my feet don't even touch the floor when I'm seated.
- Built in tool benches make no sense to me unless you're making cups.

Josh Bernbaum
02-10-2012, 08:29 PM
Thanks for all the info, opinions, and rants..

Michael Ahlefeldt-Laurvig
02-14-2012, 12:07 PM
Josh-here is a photo of my bench. Sorry about the pile of wood panel in front - its low season here and Im shut down. Note arrangement of the legs- you can slide all the way out to the right and sit there without the thing tipping at all. I find it comfortable even when doing small stuff to not have to lean out too much- bad back. The right arm (when sitting) is a 6 mm standing flat iron with a rounded profile on top so it gives minimum friction when sliding your pipe sideways, and the left arm has a round pipe with a rubber hose split and covering the iron so the pipe wont slip when rolling on the bench. I like having the tools Im using on my bench- don't quite understand how it works without space for them to my right. Don't skimp on the materials, build it sturdy.

Jordan Kube
02-14-2012, 05:23 PM
You make a separate tool table not shown in my pictures. It can move around depending on what kind of work you are doing and you can make it a little bigger than whatever piece of wood you used for the seat. Holds more tools and makes a bigger target for when you need to move fast.

Paul Hayworth
02-15-2012, 11:56 AM
http://striniartglass.com/about-us.aspx