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Jim Antonius
03-05-2012, 01:03 PM
Greeting,
I am interested in building a Color Pot Furnace (3 pot) and don't necessarily want to re-invent the wheel.
Do any of you have any plans, photos, crucible size, etc suggestions that I may utilize.
Regards,
Jim

Lawrence Ruskin
03-05-2012, 04:22 PM
depends on the size. look up Mayne Island Glass.
He has a parts lis and a video to show you how to build a small SiC furnace which you could re-jig

Pete VanderLaan
03-05-2012, 04:46 PM
Don't make a color furnace electric- period. You will never be able to melt fluorines in it. I think that the 4th edition of Glassnotes ( The new one) has a basic design in it from Peiser.

David Sandidge
03-05-2012, 09:38 PM
this looks like an interesting color pot electric furnace

http://www.paragonweb.com/Trifecta_Crucible.cfm

Greg Vriethoff
03-05-2012, 11:29 PM
I think that the 4th edition of Glassnotes ( The new one) has a basic design in it from Peiser.
Off the top of my head there's a couple of photos of it, but no actual plans.

Pete VanderLaan
03-06-2012, 03:54 AM
I don't view a small color furnace as rocket science. Keep the flame off the pots. Insulate. You're there. I used to cast them in 55 gallon drums sometimes.

Rob Williams
03-06-2012, 09:05 AM
Yes, there are a couple of pics but no plans. I was wondering about this myself. I know that there are some plans with the giberson burner here that could be used for a small, small setup.
http://www.joppaglass.com/burner/mini_square_PDF_PG.html

any others around?

Tom Fuhrman
03-06-2012, 10:36 AM
as I recall some of the ones we made used 3 20lb. pots and had a 2 piece sliding door that was on the top so you could access any of the 3 pots without opening the entire furnace. Crucibles were placed on a "shelf" and the flame shot under them so there was no direct flame on the pots. I know they had one of these in the early years at Toledo and Penland. I think it was fired from one end with a vent/chimney at the opposing end that had a damper and could be controlled. You gathered from the top .

Pete VanderLaan
03-06-2012, 11:06 AM
as I recall some of the ones we made used 3 20lb. pots and had a 2 piece sliding door that was on the top so you could access any of the 3 pots without opening the entire furnace. Crucibles were placed on a "shelf" and the flame shot under them so there was no direct flame on the pots. I know they had one of these in the early years at Toledo and Penland. I think it was fired from one end with a vent/chimney at the opposing end that had a damper and could be controlled. You gathered from the top .
***************
That was the early Peiser design. My experience is that if you melt more than two colors at a time, you won't use them. It can really be quite small with 7 inch pots holding 13 lbs each. My current furnace has three 75 lb pots. The class will add eight more in two separate furnaces.

Jordan Kube
03-06-2012, 11:48 AM
If fluorines aren't a big deal, electric melters can be an easy, economic way to get into color making.

Pete VanderLaan
03-06-2012, 12:31 PM
I encourage gas melts because you can control the atmospheric environment with gas. With electric it's always oxidizing and you are in for a battle on glasses needing reduction. I used to unabashedly make the best copper ruby in the world but now it's just average since I don't have a gas furnace for the melt. I would agree that an electric kiln is a fast and easy way in with the caveat that most electric kilns were not designed for continuous duty. Watch out where you set them up.

Dave Bross
03-06-2012, 06:06 PM
Put some pots in the back of your glory and build an access hatch to get at them.

Agreed on a gas melter being preferable.

Or...

Ghetto (or Trinidad) gas furnace = pipe burner and a pile of firebricks, frax or whatever refractory. Easily done in a day. Hit the search feature here for pipe burner info.


Small is beautiful? Or...how much color do you really need. Alot of it doesn't do well sitting for days. Need color every day? How about multiple small melters...one melting, one ready to go.

Franklin Sankar
03-07-2012, 05:28 AM
Blasting heat into a glory hole is not a problem but controlling the temp in a gas furnace seem to need an expensive controller. Is there a ghetto soln? Save the pot.
Franklin

Pete VanderLaan
03-07-2012, 06:32 AM
Use porcelain coffee cups. You won't make color from batch glasses this way but you could melt down color bar, sort of. It's not a solution I would have ever tried and I tried a lot of stuff.

Doug Terrell
04-30-2013, 04:38 PM
***************
My current furnace has three 75 lb pots.

Could you post a picture?

Pete VanderLaan
04-30-2013, 05:16 PM
I do not have the time currently. I am prepping two furnaces for the class which will hold an additional ten pots. I'm overbooked.

Eben Horton
04-30-2013, 05:55 PM
heres his old beast! 3770

Rollin Karg
05-01-2013, 01:16 AM
This is one we built ten years ago. It now has a Recuperator and I don't use the DFC assay pots anymore. The small pots Pete sells are much better for this application. We currently run one 10" pot and four 7" pots.

http://s29.photobucket.com/user/RollinKarg/library/Color%20Pot%2012-23-03?sort=3&page=1

Brian Graham
05-01-2013, 06:54 AM
Nice unit Rollin.....

Kenny Pieper
05-01-2013, 07:24 AM
This is one we built ten years ago. It now has a Recuperator and I don't use the DFC assay pots anymore. The small pots Pete sells are much better for this application. We currently run one 10" pot and four 7" pots.

http://s29.photobucket.com/user/RollinKarg/library/Color%20Pot%2012-23-03?sort=3&page=1

Rollin it looks like soft brick for the floor. Am I seeing this wrong? Is the drain under the flue?
I suppose you had to use a different burner with a recuperator.

Eben Horton
05-01-2013, 08:03 AM
I suppose you had to use a different burner with a recuperator.

pine ridge burners work just fine with exterior metal recouperators.

Rollin Karg
05-01-2013, 03:59 PM
Kenny, the floor is also Korundals. If you look at the photo with the burner just standing in place you can see the edge of the hard floor. I like the ribbon burner, but when we installed the recuperator we used one of our own burners. That burner is somewhat like a Thermjet, but I felt like I could fabricate one with a little better mixing. I used the same unit on all our gas furnaces and the ribbon burner went onto a Glory Hole. Eventually all those burners got mothballed when we went electric. The color pot remains gas.

No drain we can keep the glass cleaned out of the bottom fairly easily with a punty. Any leftover can be chipped out with an air hammer durning pot change.

My first color pot was an old Foundry unit that held one twenty pot. It's how we learned to make color. No thermocouple, just air and gas controls and a Grainger 4C442 blower.
Later we built a unit that held three pots and each pot was twenty pounds. Later still we came to the current configuration. We also run a 400 pound, freestanding electric pot furnace for making silver blue and black. We will run black for three or four weeks then switch to blue and after awhile back to black depending on orders and the the whim of the artist.

Hot color rocks !!!!

http://s29.photobucket.com/user/RollinKarg/media/Color%20Pot%2012-23-03/DSC03729.jpg.html?sort=3&o=39

Charles Friedman
05-01-2013, 04:49 PM
Here is my 4 color pot furnace. 3 or 4 firings before changing pot.

Work great for melting someone's old glass set or just someone.

Make planters out of old pots.

Pete VanderLaan
05-01-2013, 04:59 PM
The photo Eben supplied is of a furnace I ran back around 2003. It held two 24 inch and one 14 inch pot. Big ugly recuperated mother but it made sweet glass as do all my big ugly pieces of equipment.

My new one that is currently running holds three 7 lb pots. I sail a much smaller ship now. One of the new furnaces for the class has 7 7.5 inch pots, The other has two 7.5 inch pots and one 11 inch. That's a lot of pots.

I picked up my supplies today at Charlie Correll's and he and Josh Bernbaum and I had a nice lunch.

There's no rocket science to multiple pot furnaces although I don't care for top loaders. Just make sure you can gather to the floor of the pots to clean them. Having one clear pot and two color pots saves a huge amount of money on color rod and the time taken to heat up color rod.

Kenny Pieper
05-02-2013, 07:28 AM
I have to say that I do like top loading color furnaces for the ease of gathering, dripping off and changing the pots.
The big disadvantage is that it is hard to get a good seal around the door.

Pete VanderLaan
05-02-2013, 11:20 AM
High alumina brick has gotten to be profoundly expensive. I think a Korundal is about $30 for a nine inch straight.

Antti Torstensson
06-05-2013, 08:15 AM
Has someone here actually used the porcelain dish in a gloryhole method? I tried it today, but the pot cracked. Should most porcelain dishes be generally suitable for this method or is it hard to find a type that suits?

Is there any chance getting more than one use out of an assay pot this way?

George Vidas
06-05-2013, 09:44 AM
We were using C-handle coffee cups for small color pots in the GH for a minute. I made a point of looking for the most generic form of mug, figuring those were most mass-produced and thus probably most like the ones that other people have used. I found a thrift store here that gave me 50% off for a box of 15, so $0.50/ea.

The basic method that worked for us was to bring them up to ~1050 in a pickup oven several hours before blowing, allowing the color bar to almost flatten. I made a set of tongs to get them out of the pickup and into the GH. Several cracked; we had fewer crack when they were full of color (more thermal mass?) and had soaked at 1050 for several hours.

I never felt like they were worth reusing. I think even the ones put into the annealer cracked, and were always filthy once we were done with them (grog from the GH floor, glaze mixing into color, etc.)