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View Full Version : Go To Hell(er)!


Rich Samuel
05-18-2012, 08:36 AM
So, I call Heller Gallery yesterday to confirm it's open, then schlep there all the way from Alphabet City, only to find it's closed for the installation of a new show. :mad: The show I hoped to catch, which has been extended, is new work by Lino, though it doesn't look very "Linoish."

http://www.hellergallery.com/exhibits/041412-tagliapietra/

Surprisingly little glass in the galleries here, though the show at MAD has some jaw-droppingly great stuff.

http://collections.madmuseum.org/code/emuseum.asp?emu_action=advsearch&rawsearch=exhibitionid/%2C/is/%2C/553/%2C/true/%2C/false&profile=exhibitions

Off to the Finger Lakes tomorrow; CMoG on Sunday!

Brice Turnbull
05-19-2012, 05:13 PM
I like Lino's Fenice pieces :)

Thanks for the link Rich.

John Riepma
05-19-2012, 07:50 PM
So who does all the coldworking on those pieces? I've often wondered that about Lino's and others' work, since it seems like much of the visual appeal of that work and most of the time invested in the total project is dependent on the talent involved in the coldworking process. It just seems like it would be very exhausting to manipulate one of the larger pieces through that entire process without a misstep. Or am I missing something?

David Patchen
05-19-2012, 10:55 PM
If I remember correctly, Paolo Ferro's coldworking shop on Murano did the coldworking for years. Then I think Greg Dietrich (amazing engraver) did them, but he moved to Mexico. I don't know who does them now, but no one is doing it freehand totally supporting the weight of those pieces. It's just not sustainable for the amount of carving that's done.

Travis Frink
05-20-2012, 04:53 AM
So is it some kind of handheld engraver? I have often wondered how some of the curves and what not got worked- not to mention the fact that a lot of those pieces are really large, heavy and or awkwardly shaped from a cold working perspective.

Pete VanderLaan
05-20-2012, 09:19 AM
I would not assume machinery necessarily. hen MaryBeth was working on her larger polished stuff, it could weigh up to 90 lbs actually with the bulk being about 50lbs. Our staff became very adept at figuring out ways to get it up to the machines and ultimately just toughed it out final polishing with upright corks and felts. Interestingly it was about impossible to polish stuff like that on horizontal wheels since you just relaxed too much and the wheelhead would catch the work, destroying the wheel, and occasionally the piece itself.

I don't miss polishing that stuff at all.

Marty Kremer
05-20-2012, 06:20 PM
Brian B. had a system of platforms, pulleys, bungees and counterweights to get his heavy work to the wheels.
Whitely uses a Suhner flex shaft.

Rich Samuel
05-24-2012, 09:13 AM
Happened to be back in the neighborhood yesterday, and Heller was open. Lino's new work is far better "in the flesh" than the photos suggest, and seems to be as much (maybe more) about the battuto as the glass. The precision of the cutting is mind-blowing! The all-gold pieces left me cold, as they appeared to be painted, and perhaps they were.

And if you plan to purchase any of these (Ha!), dig deep, or wait for a show in another city. Prices are nearly double what the same work goes for in Seattle! :O

Jon Myers
05-24-2012, 01:57 PM
If I remember correctly, Paolo Ferro's coldworking shop on Murano did the coldworking for years. Then I think Greg Dietrich (amazing engraver) did them, but he moved to Mexico. I don't know who does them now, but no one is doing it freehand totally supporting the weight of those pieces. It's just not sustainable for the amount of carving that's done.

A guy on Lopez whose name slips my mind is doing the coldwork (what was his name Rahmen?)

Rahman Anderson
05-28-2012, 11:36 PM
My good friend does all carving. All done freehand. All done on a lathe. He hates his job.

Rahman Anderson
05-28-2012, 11:39 PM
First person to walk into my studio while I made the first piece ever in it by myself.

John Riepma
05-29-2012, 02:58 PM
(quote)"He hates his job."


Ok, that answers my question - I must be doing it right...;)

Pete VanderLaan
05-29-2012, 05:20 PM
My good friend does all carving. All done freehand. All done on a lathe. He hates his job.
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I am so glad that in my life I have never, ever hated my job.