PDA

View Full Version : Interesting design


Joe Pfeifer
05-22-2012, 10:34 AM
http://www.pozible.com/index.php/archive/index/5706/description/0/0

Dave Bross
05-22-2012, 11:22 AM
If that first pic that says "I am ready" is a vid it won't play for me.

I would like to see how he utilizes waste heat.

Jokes about copper tubing wrapped around the furnace come to mind...

David Patchen
05-22-2012, 11:38 AM
The design philosophy of using all the waste heat is great and he's put together a cool unit. It's an interesting design but all the fiber looks unsafe and I don't understand how you gather out of those tall pots.

Rollin Karg
05-23-2012, 05:47 AM
Some cool stuff going on there. He says 20 amp breaker, but doesn't say what the fuel costs are.

Hugh Jenkins
05-23-2012, 02:34 PM
Oh heck fire. The secret of glass is really out there now. Anyone can do it anywhere for almost no money and very low operating expense. We are doomed!

As a detail, Australia uses 220 as the standard voltage. As protection, all plugs have a switch as well. When we think of 20 amps we normally think of 110/ 120v.

Hugh Jenkins
05-23-2012, 02:55 PM
I know that the UK and now possibly Australia have gone to the biofiber blanket. We can get it as Superwool I think. Supposedly does not remain for any length of time in the lungs. I do not know how it holds up against batch fumes.

Any one know more than that?

I do not mean to disparage anyones creativity. I have seen some very wild equipment building in the last few years done with the intent to reduce fuel and energy costs, cycle, recycle and reuse the otherwise wasted heat that the old style equipment most of us grew up with allowed. Obviously, all fiber construction alleviates the thermal mass issues. The framing and fabrication look well designed and executed.

Portability can be a great thing. Low cost of heating up, melting, blowing and shutting down, is already a consideration for some studios. I think a lot of fun could be had in a lot more back yards. I don't see this changing the way most of us operate. This guy says he mostly makes beads. 30# of glass would make a lot of beads.

Very interesting approach to fund raising.

Mitcheal Veenstra
05-23-2012, 08:12 PM
I poked around it a bit, watched the video, found another video of him gathering from one of them and working a piece, found his facebook page. He claims it'll melt 20 kilos for $30 a day. He's melting cullet, I don't think he batches in it.

It'd work, heck, I've seen lower tech all fiber furnaces before that worked that were made in half a metal 55 gallon drum. Fiber exposure/danger, yeah, unless the biowool is really safe to use that'd be a concern, but then again, there are a lot of fiber glories running around still in shops, or glories that have fiber doors. (shrug)

He's a hobbiest, a little different than someone who blows 6 days a week for a living. His equipment needs are a bit different. For a hobby blower, it'd probably be an alright piece of all in one equipment. At least once you built it you'd know how to repair it. Face the fiber with a shell and that'd help cut down free floating fiber. What's that product you use again Dave with your stuff? It's in my notes somewhere but I'm not near them tonight.

Mitch

Pete VanderLaan
05-23-2012, 09:02 PM
milled zircon with colloidal silica or alumina as a binder.

I don't consider $30 per day for 20KG to be cheap. That kind of furnace can be a real problem in a forced shutdown since it has no mass. It really plunges.

Mark Rosenbaum
05-23-2012, 09:24 PM
milled zircon with colloidal silica or alumina as a binder.

I don't consider $30 per day for 20KG to be cheap. That kind of furnace can be a real problem in a forced shutdown since it has no mass. It really plunges.

Shit, I run a 400lb furnace, 3 big lehrs, 3 glory holes, pipe warmer, AC, and all my other electrical (lights, etc.) for under $2000 a month. (and I can gather out of the furnace pretty easily) ;)

Hugh Jenkins
05-23-2012, 09:52 PM
Cost has a much to do with where you are as how much fuel is used. I am in one of the worst fuel cost situations anywhere so I know. I would want to know how much fuel, electricity, etc it takes to run this thing. I do not consider $30 a day to be very good either.

But if it only runs a little now and a little then, it might fit certain situations.

David Patchen
05-23-2012, 10:59 PM
Shit, I run a 400lb furnace, 3 big lehrs, 3 glory holes, pipe warmer, AC, and all my other electrical (lights, etc.) for under $2000 a month. (and I can gather out of the furnace pretty easily) ;)

That sounds amazingly cheap. It would be interesting to compare monthly electric and gas consumption.

Mark Rosenbaum
05-23-2012, 11:34 PM
That sounds amazingly cheap. It would be interesting to compare monthly electric and gas consumption.

Not a problem David. I can post #s when I get to the studio. IIRC, it is a little over $1000 for electrical and a little under $1000 for gas. I run a 400lb Stadelman furnace, and my AC is on pretty much 9-5 in the office and gallery (3000 sq.ft.)

David Hopman
05-23-2012, 11:45 PM
That sounds amazingly cheap. It would be interesting to compare monthly electric and gas consumption.

Let's express it in kilowatthours and gallons so we can all compare without price differentials.

200lb electric furnace and glory hole, gallery and shop lighting and power- 11,500kwh per month.

Pipe warmer-12 gal propane per month.

Pete VanderLaan
05-24-2012, 06:18 AM
But if it only runs a little now and a little then, it might fit certain situations.
*************
That is true with the caveat that turning a furnace on and off is actually hard on the pot, which costs real money. In some instances shipping the pot costs as much as the pot itself.

As studio glass moves more and more into these little acts, information gets stranger and harder to read. Claims of efficiency for me are pretty dubious. It might be better to look at how many dollars worth of salable product are made each month divided by the costs- at least for a wholesale shop.

I am horribly inefficient and have been for a long time. I do a lot of other things besides making glass but I want it hot when the opportunity comes to work. Things are in the saddle and ride mankind as they say. I have firewood to split today and I can actually get into the forest. Winter's coming.