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-   -   Cement Floor Finish for a HotShop (http://talk.craftweb.com/showthread.php?t=12579)

Pouce Verre 04-14-2020 07:15 PM

Cement Floor Finish for a HotShop
 
Hi Everyone!

New here, but been reading for a few months.
I come from the Boro glass world. Ive been working with glass for 18years, and did 4 years of Hot Shop work a while ago and im setting up to get back into it as i miss it... im old school and I love forum format, less annoying that facebook, and more indepth.

I will run for now the small hot shop with the 2 Skutt Furnace i was using to melt borosilicate, using 30 and 60pounds crucible.


As im working on getting the new 800sqf ready for the hot shop, im really debating about the best way to finish the floor on it.

It is a thick heated radiant Slab , with the actual finish being hand trowel.

Im wondering if i should leave it as is or acid wash and seal as i usually do , or else ?... most shop i saw had a nice finished flooring made with the helicopter machine or flat grounded by sander... mine if more ruff..

Since we will most obviously drop a bunch on glass on it, im wondering about offgazing/burning the stain or the sealer i would put on it , but also that would generate toxic gases while burning etc... I dont care about burn mark, but more about the toxic side of it...
but leaving it as is might imply more dust, more porous, etc...

if you guys have any input on this it would be greatly appreciated,

sorry if my english isnt always perfect as my first language is French.. (Quebec)

Thanks !

Loc

Pete VanderLaan 04-14-2020 07:36 PM

Mine ran a polisher until they ran out of fuel and it was sealed with Thompson's water seal.

I've had broom surface in the past and regretted it.

Rich Samuel 04-14-2020 11:10 PM

Is there a drain? If not, won't the radiant slab make installing one tricky?

Pete VanderLaan 04-15-2020 07:17 AM

I had a drain in my slab. I used it and it clogged permanently. Bullseye had floor drains and in the end game had to clean out the Portland Storm drain system. Better to use oiled sawdust for cleanup.

Art Freas 04-15-2020 08:45 AM

Done a lot of building and a lot of concreate work. I agree with Pete, no broom finish, will trap a lot of dirt and glass dust. My one concern is with the underfloor radiant heat. If it is the plastic pipe in the concrete I am not sure how that would behave under the furnace. I would check with the manufacturer and make sure there is some heat barrier between the furnace in the floor. If it is a fluid system it may transfer heat the the rest of the shop when it is not running even in summer. Over time that part of the floor picks up a lot of heat. Not sure how the pipe would behave. For a floor drain there are specialized traps but you have to be diligent about cleaning them. If you do put in a drain go oversized both in pipe size and trap size. Also make sure you have a good cleanouts in the pipe run.

Josh Bernbaum 04-15-2020 08:54 AM

I caught my concrete guy just getting ready to pour some sealant on the floor just after he cast it and 'helicopter' machined it here years ago. I asked "what's in that bucket?" He said it was some plastic-y type sealant that would make the floor look good. I'm glad I caught him in time and he didn't pour it. I could only imagine that anything hot that dribbled on the floor would make that burn and maybe leave marks. 13 years later, my floor looks fine to me, even without a sealant.

Max Epstein 04-15-2020 09:57 AM

Not germaine to the conversation, but heated floors are the shit. Had them up in Alaska and made all the difference.

Pete VanderLaan 04-15-2020 10:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Josh Bernbaum (Post 147624)
I caught my concrete guy just getting ready to pour some sealant on the floor just after he cast it and 'helicopter' machined it here years ago. I asked "what's in that bucket?" He said it was some plastic-y type sealant that would make the floor look good. I'm glad I caught him in time and he didn't pour it. I could only imagine that anything hot that dribbled on the floor would make that burn and maybe leave marks. 13 years later, my floor looks fine to me, even without a sealant.

****
The purpose of the sealant ( Thompson's) is actually to help the concrete cure slowly. I don't get any residue burning off my floor.

Victor Chiarizia 04-15-2020 03:08 PM

i stained and sealed my floor 15 years ago and it still looks pretty good. pex tubes are good to ~180deg F so i don't think there's an issue. had them in my shop in CT and the floors were wonderful to stand on bare footed. have them in my house i built here in NC too. best heat in the world. vic

oh....power trowed is my finish of choice although they can be slippery when wet if the guy trowels them too well. stains are fantastically beautiful and you can apply them yourself.

Greg Vriethoff 04-15-2020 03:13 PM

I think the sealant that Josh is referring to might be a coating rather than concrete sealer. A friend of mine here in Charlotte has been building a studio (not a glass person, but a ceramist) and used an epoxy-type coating. These are good for easy maintenance, but yeah, you don't want to be dribbling hot glass on 'em.

Art Freas 04-15-2020 05:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Victor Chiarizia (Post 147633)
i stained and sealed my floor 15 years ago and it still looks pretty good. pex tubes are good to ~180deg F so i don't think there's an issue. had them in my shop in CT and the floors were wonderful to stand on bare footed. have them in my house i built here in NC too. best heat in the world. vic

oh....power trowed is my finish of choice although they can be slippery when wet if the guy trowels them too well. stains are fantastically beautiful and you can apply them yourself.

Good to hear on the tubes, I honestly never had anyone have any thing as hot as a furnace above them. Had the concrete folks put them in the wrong place on a habitat build and we couldn't shoot the plates in, had to use some nasty glue for the interior walls on the slab.

Hugh Jenkins 04-21-2020 12:21 AM

If you still can, make all surfaces drain to the walls and put in scuppers so you can hose out. I have had some issues at the school with smooth floors and spilled water. I did do broom finish on my current shop extension and it requires vacuuming rather than sweeping for real cleaning.

Paul Thompson 04-25-2020 01:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hugh Jenkins (Post 147648)
If you still can, make all surfaces drain to the walls and put in scuppers so you can hose out. I have had some issues at the school with smooth floors and spilled water. I did do broom finish on my current shop extension and it requires vacuuming rather than sweeping for real cleaning.

Wouldn't troughs along the walls be hidden under cabinets, shelves and equipment?


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