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Old 04-04-2005, 12:34 PM
Pete VanderLaan's Avatar
Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
The Old Gaffer
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Chocorua New Hampshire
Posts: 19,445
Pete VanderLaan is on a distinguished road
Jeez, I didn't think that saying I thought the trident seal was sensitive constituted "railing" but everything I've been told about it said they were easy to break.

I anneal my ring tests overnight since I am seldom in a hurry. Factory floor tests are pretty much what Skeels was doing..

I also still use my dilatometer, all of the time since it tells me where in the ballpark I am. If a ring sample or a trident seal breaks, you don't know anything. Los Alamos Labs assured me that regardless of the modest cost of my unit, that it is quite accurate when tested against their big kids toys. I would admit that when I turn it over to the inexperienced, strange things happen. I believe that Corning will also say that any tests that you do there should be performed by the same person.

Ring tests really speak to you the moment you put them in the diamond saw. 99 times out of 100, if you saw it, it breaks right away if it is strained. For that, you need no polariscope but then again you don't know which side of the expansion viscosity curve you were on the wrong side of either. The more tools you use, the better off you are. I would say that since I got rid of my "Help", I have never had a complaint about a rod or a frit not fitting SP87. or other comparable soda lime glasses.

What I have gotten out of this thread, and I greatly appreciate it, is the need to pay a lot more attention to the annealing point as determined by the spreadsheet as well as physically measuring it . It's also nice to see John Croucher surface after some time in the shadows.
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