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Old 01-10-2019, 03:19 PM
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Franklin Sankar Franklin Sankar is offline
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Can AI kills the artist

Quote.....AI could make it impossible for artists and novelists to make a living
Copyright protections were originally designed to incentivise creators and allow them to profit from their work, but what happens when the artist is a machine?

Happy new year
Franklin
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Old 01-11-2019, 12:41 AM
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Pringle Teetor Pringle Teetor is offline
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https://www.bloomberg.com/news/video...-a-robot-video
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Old 01-12-2019, 05:40 AM
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Franklin Sankar Franklin Sankar is offline
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Some day we will see a glass printing 3D printer
Franklin
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Old 01-12-2019, 08:53 AM
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It already exists. ( German)
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Old 01-12-2019, 10:48 AM
Tom Fuhrman Tom Fuhrman is offline
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I think if we look at history, this is already the case. If you look in the 1st New Glass Survey published by Corning about 1980, they included pieces made by machine from the U.S., Japan, Germany and possibly others. The machine was making all of the designs that the artist/ designer had initially drawn up for production. If the Corning Museum designated these as "art" glass back then, I think we have to give their view great credibility.

In Europe, it was the tradition for many years that the "artist" never produced the glass, but only designed and it was made by the factory in the most expeditious way possible at the time. I can remember being at the IGS in Novy Bor many years ago and there were glass artists there from all over the world that simply had to be an assistant or on looker as their designs were produced by the Czech factory craftsmen from several different factories. Marvin only got to punch his wooden forms into the blown vessels as they were nearing completion and it about drove Rich Royal nuts not be further involved in the production of his pieces.
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Old 01-12-2019, 12:08 PM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Fuhrman View Post
If the Corning Museum designated these as "art" glass back then, I think we have to give their view great credibility.
*******
I don't know if I'd give Corning that power at all. Curators come and go and sometimes bad choices have been made. There's some difference between selecting the best examples of an era and the most important examples. That goes on now.
Even in the ancient glass section, what we really see in those cases are often the production of their day and the reason the examples exist is because so many of the things were made.

Probably the most boring publication Corning did on the subject was the 1960 evaluation of modern glass. That work was absolutely devoid of any merit. Just godawful.

I do think that the change that occurred with the new studio impetus in 1962 was to attempt to force the museum and collectors into acknowledging that prior work had indeed become awful and that recognition of new approaches were justified. It didn't hurt those instructors careers either. I remember all these people running around with their slide sets to show at gigs where the instructor at school "X" got lunch. beer , some small payment and then they were off to the next deal. Marvin turned it into an artform in itself.

John Nickerson was a designer at Blenko at one point and is an interesting man He did the full body mockups for automobiles in clay that would become the desired car in detroit . He was really good at it. When Shorty Findlay was pushing for me to become a designer there, Nick told me it would make me crazy and that as soon as I left, the floor would change the work. They wanted me to come in and not even live there. I could go home. I passed. By the time the third wave attempt to place glass school graduates was in gear, all these degreed artists were making arty stuff that the factory couldn't produce and clients at Stucky's didn't want to buy. That was the last move before the private studio became a goal but those private shops were spit on by the schools since there was no obvious need for the instructors that were canonized. Some remarkably good work came out of the independent shops and it was categorically ignored since, in my opinion, it was a threat.

But the factories are what they are. Small shops emulate them today in that the goal is to make money making the same thing again and again. Marketing is more and more difficult to do. Those same small shops would never bring in a designer. Designers have no clue about the economics of running the shop. There's a good reason there are so many pumpkins out there. They sell. Don't get confused and use the word art in the discussion. It ain't.
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