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Old 01-08-2019, 08:16 PM
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Pringle Teetor Pringle Teetor is offline
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Off the hump?

Is there such a thing in glass as blowing off the hump like I used to do in production pottery? Weíve been making some nice cane ornaments but they rake about 20 Minutes from setup to box. Just 2 people. Im wondering if there is a way to go faster............thoughts?
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Old 01-08-2019, 08:54 PM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is online now
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Yes. Keep the cane thick. I can get about 4 to 6 off of one roll up.
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Old 01-09-2019, 08:49 AM
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Cane you explain a little more please? You roll up, then do you just heat the end for the first Ornament? What happens to the roll up while you are hooking, boxing etc or does someone else do that? Then you close th end of the roll up again? Etc etc?
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Old 01-09-2019, 10:44 AM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pringle Teetor View Post
Cane you explain a little more please? You roll up, then do you just heat the end for the first Ornament? What happens to the roll up while you are hooking, boxing etc or does someone else do that? Then you close th end of the roll up again? Etc etc?
Thatís how I do it. I will give the moil a good blast with the torch before I bono off the ornament just in case it wants to crack. Sometimes I will just put it on a pipe hanger if I am alone. 2 people makes it easier. 3 people makes it profitable. I havenít done it in years though
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Old 01-11-2019, 04:47 PM
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Three people? I would love to see some analysis of those costs divided out per hour, based on orders that were sold, with hourly wages, based on what to do with the employees when those pieces were not being made. That approach destroyed a lot of studios in the 2008 meltdown.

I've talked to people today who still try to produce 10,000 lbs of " Production" based on this sort of stats.

Production is a tricky animal based on some constants and they include demand. .
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Old 01-11-2019, 05:37 PM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is online now
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Three people? I would love to see some analysis of those costs divided out per hour, based on orders that were sold, with hourly wages, based on what to do with the employees when those pieces were not being made. That approach destroyed a lot of studios in the 2008 meltdown.

I've talked to people today who still try to produce 10,000 lbs of " Production" based on this sort of stats.

Production is a tricky animal based on some constants and they include demand. .
I like the saying -
The dog who never leaves the porch will find no bones.

Since we moved our studio, demand in our work has exploded and we had to hire some help. Blowing glass with 3 people is how I learned and is incredibly efficient compared to blowing solo , which in my opinion is really only viable if you have a home studio and are making high end vessels.
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Old 01-11-2019, 05:37 PM
chris Harman chris Harman is offline
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I usually use a modified from of suppio... it works well for transparent colors, and thicker cane made with duro. Basically make a dense overlay, or thick cane roll up, gather over once, and make a tube about 18"-20" long. Once annealed, saw into 2"-2.5" sections, then wash, then bring up in the pick up box, stab it up on a collar, and then use as you normally would.
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Old 01-11-2019, 08:14 PM
Jordan Kube Jordan Kube is offline
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What Chris describes is a great way to do a lot of more time consuming set ups in small format. Cold time is cheaper than hot time and cold skills are cheaper than hot skills(for that operation).
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Old 01-12-2019, 04:32 AM
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Franklin Sankar Franklin Sankar is online now
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quote...... compared to blowing solo , which in my opinion is really only viable if you have a home studio and are making high end vessels.
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Eben are you saying that a home studio Blowing solo can make high end pieces?
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Old 01-12-2019, 06:27 AM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Franklin Sankar View Post
quote...... compared to blowing solo , which in my opinion is really only viable if you have a home studio and are making high end vessels.
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Eben are you saying that a home studio Blowing solo can make high end pieces?
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Of course. Itís all about the skill of the artist though.
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Old 01-12-2019, 12:57 PM
Larry Cazes Larry Cazes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Franklin Sankar View Post
quote...... compared to blowing solo , which in my opinion is really only viable if you have a home studio and are making high end vessels.
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Eben are you saying that a home studio Blowing solo can make high end pieces?
Franklin
I have a friend here in San jose who does more then most teams do but he does it all solo. This is how glass was predominantly worked in this country prior to the studio movement in the 60s.
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Old 01-13-2019, 10:16 AM
Tom Fuhrman Tom Fuhrman is offline
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in today's world, technology can play a big part. a few years ago, I was told about a glassblower in Canada that did nothing but make Christmas balls and could produce between 300-400 per day, by himself. He was a former engineer at IBM or Xerox and made equipment that allowed him to produce huge quantities while not compromising his health and body. This allowed him to actually compete with the cheaper imports in price. I won't go into detail as to some of the equipment he created to achieve this.

I used to be able to do a small version of blowing "off the Hump" but could onlt get about 3-4 pieces from it. Marble makers were always making multiple pieces from one setup. I remember seeing Jody Fine many years ago that only ran his furnace for a few weeks making setups and then shut down. Afterwards he would bring the setups up to temp and picked them up sat down at his bench/chair and proceeded to make marbles while he watched TV. He never had to get up except when he was required to go pickup a new setup. He did it all without getting out of his chair. annealer was near by and he just knocked off into the annealer.
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Old 01-20-2019, 11:59 AM
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So is the solo work done by making bits and pieces and retrieving them from an oven when required. What else. Bill G from Corning does some magic alone.
Franklin
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Old 01-27-2019, 03:28 PM
bob gent bob gent is offline
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I've made a lot of "door pulls" which were basically marbles. I'd set up a large mass of glass, then spend sometimes four hours or more pulling one ball after another off of the hump. I'd usually get about 40 pulls off of a setup, which made them super heavy at the outset, but at least it got easier the longer I stayed with it.
I'd occasionally save the setups so I could pick them up later without having to fire up the main pot furnace. Still have a lot of those around. Not selling as many door pulls these days
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