CraftWEB Hot Glass Talk  

Go Back   CraftWEB Hot Glass Talk > Hot Glass > General Hot Glass Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-17-2017, 06:08 PM
Ron Mynatt Ron Mynatt is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Springdale Arkansas
Posts: 114
Ron Mynatt is on a distinguished road
marbled glass

I have been getting this look sort of but would like to refine it.I am using white k61 with cherry red over it .Some times it works good but other times the red will not separate.I know this is being used on a lot of pumpkins but I would like to try it on bowls and vases .Any suggestions on what is a better way to apply the colors .Is it better on the surface or cased ?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_0806 (2).jpg (28.2 KB, 100 views)
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-18-2017, 01:02 AM
Brice Turnbull Brice Turnbull is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Salida, CO the Happy Little Town of my Happy Little Dreams
Posts: 461
Brice Turnbull is on a distinguished road
I don't know that it's better on the surface or cased, but it is different.

Generally, on the surface the colors have more defined edges. Cased they will smear and have an appearance of depth or shadows.

I can't suggest how to accentuate it more. I don't know exactly what you're doing now. I would guess it's powder red over powder white?

Try heating more reheats, or if that doesn't work, shorter or less reheats. Or heat it gooey, block it briefly so the surface is cooled, but underneath is still gooey and blow quicker. Try stuff like that.

Just my first thoughts.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-18-2017, 08:28 AM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Wakefield, RI
Posts: 3,839
Eben Horton is on a distinguished road
Surface. After you apply the powder let the piece get very cold and then stick it into the path of your glory hole burner's flame. (Higher velocity round burners are best) and get it wicked hot. Pull it out, and marver it, then blow it out.

Don't use gaffer enamel white for this. It's too soft.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-18-2017, 12:15 PM
Ron Mynatt Ron Mynatt is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Springdale Arkansas
Posts: 114
Ron Mynatt is on a distinguished road
Does Frit over powder seem to have any benefit.It seems that the powder would separate from frit better then powder on powder.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-18-2017, 02:40 PM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Wakefield, RI
Posts: 3,839
Eben Horton is on a distinguished road
Powder on powder works best for me.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-18-2017, 02:44 PM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Wakefield, RI
Posts: 3,839
Eben Horton is on a distinguished road
I like to do r-61 with gaffer green luster powder on top. The reactions look like pools of water on a white glacier.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-18-2017, 03:48 PM
Pete VanderLaan's Avatar
Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
The Old Gaffer
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Chocorua New Hampshire
Posts: 19,017
Pete VanderLaan is on a distinguished road
I believe what you're seeing is the reddish glass which contains cadmium , reacting with the white which is a leaded glass. The cadmium will turn blackish in the contact area You could do that with any lead and any cadmium based frit. . If you blow that out, it all expands and goes towards a muddier circumstance which is what you seem to be referring to. There isn't any easy fix for damping down chemical reactions that are being thinned.
__________________
Where are we going and why am I in this basket?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-18-2017, 11:09 PM
Eric Trulson Eric Trulson is offline
Young Turk
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Lowell, MA
Posts: 61
Eric Trulson is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eben Horton View Post
I like to do r-61 with gaffer green luster powder on top. The reactions look like pools of water on a white glacier.
I've become a big fan of gaffer's green lustre recently. Been playing with it in frit form a lot over the past few months. It has another good color reaction when combined with r-232 (cranberry). They form a nice straw/gold sort of color wherever they're given a chance to melt together.

I haven't gotten a chance to put any of gaffer's other lustre colors through their paces yet, although that's earmarked for my next color order. Has anybody else come across any particularly good color combination or reactions with the lustre series?
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-19-2017, 07:29 AM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Wakefield, RI
Posts: 3,839
Eben Horton is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric Trulson View Post
I've become a big fan of gaffer's green lustre recently. Been playing with it in frit form a lot over the past few months. It has another good color reaction when combined with r-232 (cranberry). They form a nice straw/gold sort of color wherever they're given a chance to melt together.

I haven't gotten a chance to put any of gaffer's other lustre colors through their paces yet, although that's earmarked for my next color order. Has anybody else come across any particularly good color combination or reactions with the lustre series?
take a sifter and dust the lightest coating of copper ruby power over the 2nd to last gather and then apply that green lustre over it. nice reactions.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:12 PM.


All published comments within these message boards are the opinions of its contributor and does not represent
the opinion(s) of the owner(s) of this website. Please see the Terms of Use file for more details.

Books to Help Artists Avoid Online Scams: Top 10 Email Scams | Social Media Scams

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CraftWEB.com. Opportunity Network. 2008. All Rights Reserved.