CraftWEB Hot Glass Talk  

Go Back   CraftWEB Hot Glass Talk > Hot Glass > General Hot Glass Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-20-2018, 07:10 AM
Tom Bloyd Tom Bloyd is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Kansas city
Posts: 146
Tom Bloyd is on a distinguished road
wire melter recos/ making cullet

I'm going to have a major rebuild over the winter and would like to get a 80lb wire melter to run while I rebuild my main furnace. Any thoughts on build vs. buy? I would like to just buy one but didn't know if any on the market are that decent.
I have always melted Spruce Pine 87 and I plan on making my own cullet over the next few months to use in the wire melter. Any input on the best way to process 500lbs or so of hot glass into cullet would be greatly appreciated.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-20-2018, 07:44 AM
Pete VanderLaan's Avatar
Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
The Old Gaffer
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Chocorua New Hampshire
Posts: 20,326
Pete VanderLaan is on a distinguished road
If you can ladle it out on a marver , then flip it and allow it to cool as a big pancake in a garbage can, then strike it in the dead center, it breaks into nice chunks with no bubbles. In my mind, bubbles from quenching in cold water make for the worst cullet. All those built in seeds.

If you can chop it up hot, that's best. preheating it before loading into a wire unit would be great too.

All the commercial wire units are underinsulated. Jen Ken is probably the best in my mind but I'd do home grown given your skills set and insulate it better than the commercial ones. Put an SCR on it.
__________________
Where are we going and why am I in this basket?
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-20-2018, 02:56 PM
Tom Bloyd Tom Bloyd is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Kansas city
Posts: 146
Tom Bloyd is on a distinguished road
Thanks Pete. I like the cutting idea. I have time to take the slow road and that make a lot of sense on future loading.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-20-2018, 07:20 PM
Pete VanderLaan's Avatar
Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
The Old Gaffer
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Chocorua New Hampshire
Posts: 20,326
Pete VanderLaan is on a distinguished road
cutting into non explosive sizes is key in production. Look at that machine Kuchinke posted on glassies for inspiration. The way SP Did it with the big gear was great too but both imply a major campaign when you get to rocking and rolling.

My method keeps the fine bubbles out but no more. If you were to preheat that cullet, which is a PIA, it would go down easily. Just don't quench it.
__________________
Where are we going and why am I in this basket?
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-21-2018, 08:12 PM
Ron Mynatt Ron Mynatt is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Springdale Arkansas
Posts: 136
Ron Mynatt is on a distinguished road
How would I find a picture of the machine you mentioned.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-22-2018, 01:53 AM
Greg Vriethoff's Avatar
Greg Vriethoff Greg Vriethoff is offline
PotatoFish
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 1,977
Greg Vriethoff is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Mynatt View Post
How would I find a picture of the machine you mentioned.
I think it was this machine.

Fairly certain this is not the same source Pete has pointed out from Glassies, but I believe it is the same machinery.
__________________
"It's such a fine line between stupid and clever." - David St. Hubbins
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-22-2018, 10:15 AM
Tom Fuhrman Tom Fuhrman is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: hills of Tennessee
Posts: 1,352
Tom Fuhrman is on a distinguished road
you can also operate a mechanism such as that used on the old marble machines. They used them without the spherical chute to produce globs. cutoffs used for cutting globs in most of the automatic bottle and jar machines could be customized for this use or order the cut off shears from the machinery companies that produce these.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-22-2018, 03:09 PM
Pete VanderLaan's Avatar
Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
The Old Gaffer
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Chocorua New Hampshire
Posts: 20,326
Pete VanderLaan is on a distinguished road
Getting the stream right is an amazing dance. The glass comes out so much faster that you might think. A lot of those set ups had what was called a conditioning tube under the bore and it had electric elements on the outside and was wrapped with insulation. At the bottom was the platinum tube. The temps could really be controlled using those things.

When Chuck Savoie and I were doing the downspout on Lucille, our overhead furnace, Chuck would take a paddle to divert what seemed like a frozen stream. He was shooting a 1/16th inch stream 20 feet across the room rapid fire.
__________________
Where are we going and why am I in this basket?
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-22-2018, 03:12 PM
Pete VanderLaan's Avatar
Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
The Old Gaffer
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Chocorua New Hampshire
Posts: 20,326
Pete VanderLaan is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Bloyd View Post
Thanks Pete. I like the cutting idea. I have time to take the slow road and that make a lot of sense on future loading.
******
Spruce Pine had a structure that let the glass come out an overflow, much like the spillway on a dam. That came onto a moving conveyor and there was a large gear ( I recall about four foot) that pressed into the still soft stream as it moved. The glass got out to the end of the conveyor , hung over the edge until it broke and went into a bin. I thought that was great seat of the pants engineering.
__________________
Where are we going and why am I in this basket?
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:02 AM.


All published comments within these message boards are the opinions of its contributor and does not represent
the opinion(s) of the owner(s) of this website. Please see the Terms of Use file for more details.

Books to Help Artists Avoid Online Scams: Top 10 Email Scams | Social Media Scams

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CraftWEB.com. Opportunity Network. 2008. All Rights Reserved.