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Old 04-21-2017, 12:41 PM
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Franklin Sankar Franklin Sankar is offline
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glass attack on wires

I made a big mess. Lumps of cullet flying out of the small pot hit the coil then the floor . Wires looks ok for now. The abuse continues. Chunks of glass on the floor melted and completely glazed the floor. I have a mix of sand and cement on the floor. will see what happens when it cools down.
I have an element on the last grove in the brick which is very near the floor. Sand raised the level of the floor. The molten glass wets the element. wires still working but will it last much longer.? will the glass kill the wires. Fenton cullet.
The pot was stuck. Did the Pete trick. heated up pried loose and kept tilted with a brick. Thanks Pete you saved me.
So with that disaster am I qualified to join the club now? Or do I still have to do the naked thing. Got KFC and it the Midnight moon tonight.
Franklin

Last edited by Franklin Sankar; 04-21-2017 at 01:16 PM.
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Old 04-21-2017, 01:18 PM
Charles Friedman Charles Friedman is offline
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Frankie That is what happens when you don't preheat the cullet. The cure is to pre heat the glass in the BBQ first.
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Old 04-21-2017, 03:42 PM
Eric Trulson Eric Trulson is offline
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You can also add some kind of sealing lid or gasket around the brim of the pot, to close off the heating element chamber from the glass entirely. I chose to do this myself after a piece of popping glass shorted out my wire melter's elements and caused a crash.

I just used a large round piece of 2300F ceramic fiber board, cut out a circle in the center the same diameter as my crucible, then pressed the board down over the top of the crucible. You could do something similar with insulating bricks and mortar, or even castable, depending on what's available.
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Old 04-21-2017, 03:51 PM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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"Frankie?"

The glass on the element will melt off and hopefully disengage from it .If it doesn't , it doesn't. Do keep in mind my trick for hot joining a broken element. You may need it.
These are really the kinds of things that determine whether you have the emotional stamina to respond to crisis, and I genuinely mean that. All of the information that has accrued over the last fifty years constantly comes into play, not so much in what you make from glass but whether you have the fortitude to keep going in the face of disaster.

I had a client call two days back. The furnace that was built was handmade and not a commercial one. The individual ran a moly and essentially ran it until the pot broke. My advice was to change the methodology for removing the pot out the front easily since I've long thought that through the crown was profoundly dumb. Doing it with a pot sunk in glass was infinitely worse.

But you do it.

In this case, the client called and wanted to cancel the order for a pot that we got out the door as fast as humanly possible. The client wanted to return it and just quit. We said the client would have to pay freight each way since it was in the pipeline already. Unhappy camper. This isn't Amazon Prime.

So we were talking about it this morning and about how crisis response was a hallmark of the '60's and '70's and I knew a substantial group that would not get broken like this. They figured out how to make batch, how to melt strange cullets, how to anneal, how to grind, how to ship and sell and get beaten up and still come back and design. . Some did extremely well. Some got crapped on by the university structure. But really, very few vanished. They are vanishing now, against their will at having been put six feet under. But they sure as hell didn't quit. Some ask for spare burners. I get it.

So, on that inspirational note, make sure you have a spare element and as Charles says "Frankie, pre heat your cullet if that's the kind of furnace you have. "

The sand will work quite well. Trust me Frankie...
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Old 04-21-2017, 05:46 PM
Michael Ahlefeldt-Laurvig Michael Ahlefeldt-Laurvig is offline
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Well when it comes to glass in my experience , Franklin is that Murphys law rules- everything that can go wrong will- and more
I used to have a tradition when a pot broke, that we cleaned out the furnace and turned off, then sat down and drank a bottle of whiskey, with the staff- always slept well with the furnace off- it always happened at the worst possible moment, big orders right before Chrisrmas etc
I have a friend who always used to say that if it had been easy to run a studio everyone would have done it
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Old 04-21-2017, 06:20 PM
Cecil McKenzie Cecil McKenzie is offline
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Franklin.....If you can't preheat your cullet you might try breaking it into much smaller pieces so it is less likely to pop and go all over.
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Old 04-21-2017, 07:39 PM
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Franklin Sankar Franklin Sankar is offline
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Thanks for all the replies. One more "big up " for the board which helped me to Discover my GAS buddy Charlie. Some of the nicest people are glassblowers.
I hope they all stay nice.
I just want to blow glass but need to learn patience when building the equipment. Let's see how long this one will last. I have enough mystery material to make another one. And then Comes the blowing part.
Pete did they make vertical gathering furnaces in the good old days?
Frankie
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Old 04-22-2017, 06:22 AM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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For some, vertical gathering is ideal, particularly if you are making colloidal colors and don't want the strands going around the piece but rather vertically from the mouth to the foot. The hard part is trailing off cleanly.
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