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  #101  
Old 06-11-2018, 06:50 PM
Lawrence Duckworth Lawrence Duckworth is offline
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...I guess I’ve been caking it on pretty heavy, very dense/dark..
Thanks again Larry, I’ll lighten up in the morning. The one I pulled out of the annealer this morning was dark chocolate.

Yes I can get a very small flame using the number 5 tip.
I’ll try using the bigger torch also to fume, I read somewhere that a small flame was better?

Last edited by Lawrence Duckworth; 06-11-2018 at 06:53 PM.
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  #102  
Old 06-11-2018, 07:21 PM
Larry Cazes Larry Cazes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lawrence Duckworth View Post
...I guess I’ve been caking it on pretty heavy, very dense/dark..
Thanks again Larry, I’ll lighten up in the morning. The one I pulled out of the annealer this morning was dark chocolate.
It might help if I could see a picture of the torch your using and maybe a picture of the flame as well. Flame chemistry is critical in regards to color and metal film thickness.


Quote:
Yes I can get a very small flame using the number 5 tip.
I’ll try using the bigger torch also to fume, I read somewhere that a small flame was better?
At least on the surface, that sounds like bad advice to me as again chemistry is very important. To me that misses the mark. Also, flame size can be somewhat compared to brush size in painting. I use different sizes based on what Im trying to achieve. One of the reasons I find these techniques so addicting is that its somewhat like painting in what you can achieve.

Last edited by Larry Cazes; 06-11-2018 at 07:24 PM.
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  #103  
Old 06-11-2018, 07:54 PM
Lawrence Duckworth Lawrence Duckworth is offline
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Iíll get you some pictures in the morning Larry.

The Bethlehem torch I have has six points surrounding a single center point. I thought that flame was a bit much for such a small target.
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  #104  
Old 06-11-2018, 08:05 PM
Lawrence Duckworth Lawrence Duckworth is offline
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Larry, the welding torch can be used with propane also, and the tip size effects the the flame size as well as oxy/propane adjustments. Iím comfortable using it and what pressures works for me. But,...if Iím on the wrong track using it...itís gone
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  #105  
Old 06-12-2018, 03:01 PM
Lawrence Duckworth Lawrence Duckworth is offline
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I like the paint brush to flame scale, great way to relate. I would say I’m using a wet #4 flat brush.
Today I used the Bethlehem torch with a #14 flat dry brush and got some nice pinks...gold only today, no silver. I might be still putting it on too heavy to get the green and blues going.

Btw, I’m keeping up with your work on instagram...beautiful glass!

Last edited by Lawrence Duckworth; 06-13-2018 at 06:46 PM.
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  #106  
Old 06-21-2018, 04:49 PM
Larry Cazes Larry Cazes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lawrence Duckworth View Post
I like the paint brush to flame scale, great way to relate. I would say Iím using a wet #4 flat brush.
Today I used the Bethlehem torch with a #14 flat dry brush and got some nice pinks...gold only today, no silver. I might be still putting it on too heavy to get the green and blues going.

Btw, Iím keeping up with your work on instagram...beautiful glass!
So the easiest way I think to explain the density Vs. color aspect of this technique is to describe the appearance of the deposited film as either Opaque when its thicker and Transparent when its much thinner and that is on the surface of the glass before its encased in clear. This photo shows a recent sphere of mine that has saturation and color and ALL of the fumed films appeared completely transparent when they were first laid down. It does take a while for your eyes to adjust to working in this way.
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  #107  
Old 06-21-2018, 06:23 PM
Lawrence Duckworth Lawrence Duckworth is offline
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Thatís pretty cool Larry, I like those swirls. Iíve done some air brush work in the past and the swirls remind me of it. Great description too.

Iím making marbles all day tomorrow and will see what happens.
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