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Old 01-30-2021, 04:34 PM
Travis Frink Travis Frink is offline
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Reusing high temp fiber insulation

Can you reuse height temp fiber that looks to be in good shape? Just pulled a lot out of an 25+ year old furnace that looks real good and thinking to reuse it. New fiber products do t seem to be what they once were. I understand theyíve been changed for safety reasons/regulations but it is being handled with utmost caution and will be completely enclosed on final installation.

The fiber in question was the innermost layer of fiber, up against the high temp castable that formed the fire chamber (for lack of a better word). It was all carefully planned and chosen almost 30 years ago but nobody remembers the original temp rating.



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Iíve been away from the board for a while devoting most of my free time and energy when not working or sleeping to renovating an old Japanese farm house. One thing led to another and... well Iím finally ready and able to focus more attention on other things.

Now, Iím helping my friend and mentor rebuild his furnace and it seems I get to be the main guy- ie. The guy with the youngest. strongest back! Trying to learn as much about the process as I can to do the job right and to carry forth into the future.
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Old 01-30-2021, 07:11 PM
Michael Ahlefeldt-Laurvig Michael Ahlefeldt-Laurvig is offline
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Is the furnace teared down? There ie nothing wrong with the insulation if it hasent crystallized and fused

Last edited by Michael Ahlefeldt-Laurvig; 01-30-2021 at 07:13 PM.
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Old 01-30-2021, 07:18 PM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Ahlefeldt-Laurvig View Post
Is the furnace teared down? There ie nothing wrong with the insulation if it hasent crystallized and fused
****
Bingo. If it feels hard, throw it away , very carefully.
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Old 01-31-2021, 07:13 AM
Travis Frink Travis Frink is offline
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Thank you.

We tore the furnace down in December. It required the 5.5kg sledge hammer to break up some of the old castable. Somebody thought it a good idea to throw all the extra castable in at the end of the pour 20-30 years ago. The top of the crown was 7-8Ē thick!

The fiber was soft and fluffy and handled with utmost care. The larger pieces will probably be used in the next furnace. We hope to pour the castable for it in about a week.
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Old 01-31-2021, 04:05 PM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is offline
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Fiber that is ďhardĒ is the most deadly substance you will deal with in furnace rebuilding. The hard stuff has gone over a certain temp and if you look at it under a microscope itís loaded with little hooks that will grab onto your lungs and never let go. Silicosis but worse.
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Old 01-31-2021, 05:35 PM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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Well, the hooks are all characteristics of alumina silicates. Asbestos has the same little hooks. The form here, which I believe is cristobalite ( they name everything) will float in the air for more efficiently.

Avoid it like it might kill you. Our shop procedure included tyvek suits, the twin filter respirator, gloves and a hair net. Reasonable procedures will keep you quite safe. I always say this but glassblowers are not dying of silicosis or asbestosis.

It's alcohol and tobacco doing in the trade.
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Old 01-31-2021, 06:34 PM
Travis Frink Travis Frink is offline
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Point taken on safety.

We were wearing Tyvek type suits and a 2 filter respirator with the pink cartridges (forgot type and #). Looked like we couldíve been dismantling a different king of furnace in a different part of Japan.

We went into a different room so the shop owner could drink a beer.

Food, drink and overall daily lifestyle really are underestimated by most people when they think about health.
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