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Old 01-23-2021, 02:34 AM
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Rich Samuel Rich Samuel is online now
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Blown Away - Season 2

No one I know this time. And they're all so young...

https://decider.com/2021/01/22/blown...am-cast-guide/
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Old 01-23-2021, 11:23 AM
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Randy Kaltenbach Randy Kaltenbach is offline
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I'm eager to see this soon. Last time I knew 3 of the 8 contestants!
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Old 01-23-2021, 08:44 PM
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Mark Rosenbaum Mark Rosenbaum is offline
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10 episodes of art school critique bullshit....
A couple of artists with skills....
Picked the winner after episode 1.
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Old 01-24-2021, 10:57 AM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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I prefer the "Great British Baking Show" actually.
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Old 01-25-2021, 03:15 PM
Rosanna Gusler Rosanna Gusler is offline
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i am sure it is like me trying to watch wicked tuna (i can't) after commercial fishing for decades and being mate on one of the first 4 greenstick boats in nc. omg that show is SUCH bs.
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Old 01-26-2021, 09:49 AM
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I like my niece's observation: "It takes hours to make a piece but if it gets broken, it takes only five minutes to make it again?"
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Old 01-26-2021, 01:44 PM
Michael Ahlefeldt-Laurvig Michael Ahlefeldt-Laurvig is offline
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I looked at these programs, and aside from the usual BS of competition programs with stress, fake drama, creative cutting etc, a couple of things stood out. I have questions:
I saw more things crack, explode in the gloryhole, fall off the punty, than Ive seen in my whole career- I mean I started wondering if their glass is really different from anything Ive blown.
Or does the production company force the blowers to do that?
Why do they come out of the furnace with a gather and let half the gather run off in a bucket? Its a total waste of glass, cant they control how much they want when they gather?
Even obviously good and experienced blowers don't have a clue how to cut a color rod with a hammer- they support the end of the rod on the sharp edge of an angle iron or against the corner of the marver and smash the hell out of it with a sharp hammer- more than half of what they need splinters into garbage and they fill the color they will use with fractures
They knock off into an assistants gloves, wacking here and there around the punty and then gives the pipe about a hundred times bigger whack with the jacks with the glass object in mid air, than what is needed on a knock off table.
They dont torch the punty mark , just run for the annealer.
They dont use long tongs to put things in the annealer- not even small things.
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Old 01-26-2021, 01:59 PM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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well, you noticed!

I would like to see this show teamed up with the moonshining show, or perhaps as Roseanna suggested, "Wicked Tuna". or the forged in fire bunch.

Dripping off glass has always been an irritant to me. When I was teaching at Pilchuck, Ben Moore had come back from Venini and was letting it all off the back of the marver at a rate of about 3,000 pounds a week. Now it was terrible glass- bottles from Northwest Glass Factory but it still was glass sort of and charging the furnaces over night yielded up lots of it. The practice has never stopped. When I strip off, if I do which is rare, I go back into the pot away from where I gather.

Color rods are simply interesting. Some people diamond saw them and some claim that ruins the color forever. Pulverize them if you feel the need. You need to get your info on that elsewhere. I don't use color rods.

People do torch their punties here. I don't. I grind a base and polish it. I can see torching.

This feels like watching a car race. You came mainly for the accidents. Those punties are big by design. It takes a lot to get it off the punty. Lots and Lots.

In Shanghai, they had a technique for pieces that wouldn't stand up. About three minutes before the piece was going to finish, three workers would start the process of making an enormous glass pad. They punched it, cooled it, torched it but it was big, usually about15-18 inches in diameter. Then when the actual work piece was done, they knocked off the piece and squished it onto the pad, balancing until it stood up OK. Then it went off to the lehr. I never got to see these pieces the next day or two since the lehrs were always cleaned out before I got to the shop. It was like cleaning up a punty in grinding. One guy did a lot of really difficult stuff.
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Old 01-26-2021, 02:05 PM
Chris Lowry Chris Lowry is offline
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Michael I think some of your questions can be explained by the difference between European glass and US glass. For example using tongs to put things away. In the US I almost never see this, in Europe I almost never see gloves.

Although I agree, I canít believe how it seems like people really donít know how to efficiently blow glass. Things like torching so long other parts crack, using newspaper to smooth out rough surfaces instead of the marver, or dropping pieces on the floor when they had a nice knock off table.

I enjoyed seeing the creativity, I am amazed what people come up with so fast. I wonder how long they had to plan. Although there wasnít much skill shown in the show. I do think the stress of the competition makes you do silly things. It also takes a few tries to work out a new idea. Something I canít believe the crap I still make after 30 years of blowing.
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