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Old 09-18-2017, 02:58 PM
Henry Halem Henry Halem is offline
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Schott

Is there anyone selling Schott glass?
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Old 09-18-2017, 05:19 PM
Bradley Howes Bradley Howes is offline
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Why on earth would you want to use schott?! I do flame working at home while I'm not at the furnace and I started off using schott. Once I knew what I was doing, I realized schott is a very bad glass to work with and I threw away every single scrap of it. I found the glass has very poor working qualities and will take any excuse to devitrify. And I don't mean the 'surface devit' that flame workers so often refer to. I mean actual devitrification of the glass structure. I prefer to use pyrex or even better, simax. They're both more expensive but well worth it.

To answer your question, I know that sundanceglass.com, mountainglass.com, and dlartglass.com all sell schott
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Last edited by Bradley Howes; 09-18-2017 at 05:24 PM.
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Old 09-18-2017, 05:48 PM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Henry Halem View Post
Is there anyone selling Schott glass?
********
I don't know Henry. The contract with HIS Glassworks ended a few years back. David Schimmel contacted me about a year back wanting to know if I wanted a large body of an LF5 as I recall. It was substantially more than I would want to amass at my age. .
The indication then was that most of the optical crazies are buying Chinese Optical glass at this point. I don't know that source although I'm sure I could get it. . I have a significant amount of Schott here and I really don't work with it much anymore. What are you looking for?
As to the other response, I would have to say that Schott probably produces the best quality glass in the world. If you don't know how to use it, seek instruction. It's the gold standard.
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Old 09-18-2017, 07:57 PM
Jordan Kube Jordan Kube is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradley Howes View Post
Why on earth would you want to use schott?! I do flame working at home while I'm not at the furnace and I started off using schott. Once I knew what I was doing, I realized schott is a very bad glass to work with and I threw away every single scrap of it. I found the glass has very poor working qualities and will take any excuse to devitrify. And I don't mean the 'surface devit' that flame workers so often refer to. I mean actual devitrification of the glass structure. I prefer to use pyrex or even better, simax. They're both more expensive but well worth it.

To answer your question, I know that sundanceglass.com, mountainglass.com, and dlartglass.com all sell schott
Schott makes lots of different types of glass. Henry is probably talking about their crystal. I haven't had any problems working Schott borosilicate glass.
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Old 09-18-2017, 09:35 PM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is offline
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I think your chances of finding some are schott Henry..
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Old 09-19-2017, 07:15 AM
David Schimmel David Schimmel is offline
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Schott is not interested in everyday artists

I believe three different applications apply to this post:

- Borosilicate tubing, of which Schott makes piles and sells to boroworkers. I have little familiarity with this product and it market.

- S8 encapsulation glass that it used by the leading soft glass paperweight makers. It is normally sold in the form of gobs ranging from 150 grams to 550 grams and more. It is used to encapsulate the colored glass setups in high value paperweights and marbles. The last melt of this glass was just prior to the fire that destroyed almost half of the Pennsylvania factory in 2015. Subsequent to this event, Schott decided to eliminate tank melting here and transferred tank production of optical glasses back to Germany. Conceivably, S8 could still be melted in the German factory, but it would require ordering a melt paid in advance. I'm not certain of the minimum melt size, but 5,000 pounds is probably not out of line. The last melt was priced in excess of $22 per pound.

- Optical glasses, especially N-BK7 crown and LF5 and F2 lead glasses. All three of these glasses are used for coldworking. N-BK7 is a hard borosilicate crown with a high softening point and not the best for casting, although there are some artists who do this. LF5 (35% Pb) is an excellent casting and coldworking glass and extremely clear. F2 (45% Pb) Is an excellent casting glass. It is softer and denser than LF5, which makes it slightly less desirable for coldworking, plus it's got a slight yellowish tinge owing to the high lead content.

These glasses and others may be available from stock, but Schott no longer warehouses much glass and the cullet pile from the old days has totally disappeared. Previously Schott melted these glasses for use by artists. The difference between the optical glasses and artistic glasses was that the artistic glasses weren't subjected to the demanding quality control processes of the glasses for precision optical use and could thus be sold at a lower price. This doesn't occur today, so, while, the glasses may be available, they are sold at list price.

When I was involved in the business, Schott had virtually no competition in North America. Today, other glass manufacturers, particularly the Chinese, have filled the void left by Schott's retreat from this market.

Other glass manufacturers, particularly the Chinese, has filled the void left by Schott.
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Old 09-19-2017, 10:37 AM
Henry Halem Henry Halem is offline
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So Schott is Shot

Thanks for the response and sorry I was not clear about what exactly I was looking for. I was looking for 1-inch thick sheet.
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Old 09-19-2017, 11:31 AM
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If you mean plate that is polished both sides, that came out of Schott of America in Yonkers NY. It was quite a different division of Schotts tendrils. I have 1/2 inch plate of that. It's very difficult to cut not following conventional expectations for plate glass. I wound up using a diamond saw. It is indeed water white and I recall the pieces are about 2x3 feet each. At that time, it was about six bucks a square ft. I don't know if David would have information on that division since he worked out of Durea.
If on the other hand, you are looking for 25 mm extrusions, I haven't seen much of it in a very long time. It is ribbed on both sides and came in about 10 inch by 30 inch sections. A major pain to polish and probably why I still have so much of it.
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Old 09-20-2017, 07:14 AM
David Schimmel David Schimmel is offline
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1 Inch Sheet

There are several possibilities for inch thick glass from Schott:

- Depending on the length and width, optical glass is available, but it needs to be ground and polished.

- Borofloat has replaced Pyrex and is available in thicknesses up to 1". It's sold out of the Louisville, KY business

- B 270, which is probably what Pete is referring to, is a water white soda lime crown available from many glass distributors, such as Swift Glass in Elmira, NY.
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Old 09-20-2017, 08:56 AM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Schimmel View Post
There are several possibilities for inch thick glass from Schott:

- Depending on the length and width, optical glass is available, but it needs to be ground and polished.

-
Man would that be pricey stuff.
When I bought the B-270, I had to buy case lots. Also pricey.
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Old 09-21-2017, 07:11 PM
Nick Delmatto Nick Delmatto is offline
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Henry, I have lead glass slabs from Pilkington Glass. They are yellowish, 1 inch thick. 16" X 11". I got them when Lancaster Glass went out of business. I can send photos if you are interested.
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Old 09-21-2017, 10:32 PM
Henry Halem Henry Halem is offline
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New direction

After much thought decided to go in a different direction and will cast my own sheets as I still have a good amount of Bullseye 1401 left over from an old job. Thanks to you all for your responses and help.
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Old 09-22-2017, 01:32 AM
Rick Wilton Rick Wilton is offline
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you can get 25mm thick (1 inch) of Starphire (low iron) float glass. It is pretty close to water white (compared to regular float glass) except that true starphire luminescences a blue tint in UV light. In fact it glows in the dark when exposed to black lights.
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