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Old 01-20-2015, 12:44 PM
Philip Yamron Philip Yamron is offline
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Electroglass furnace & saving $1500 on rebuild

Hello. So first I'd like to say hello. I am new to this community. I have been working glass for about 17 years. A couple years ago I purchased a studio worth of equipment including a 150# electroglass furnace. Flash forward to this past summer when it became painfully clear that we have to shut the furnace down and replace the crucible. Cracks on all sides getting bigger. For those of you that are unaware, Electroglass uses a square pot that is only available from Electroglass. When I called I think the price was $2000+ ( I can't remember, I'm sure i blocked the actual number out in my brain somewhere) Anyways, I spoke to Pete on the phone when I called the crucible connection checking in about crucible sizes and capacities. So long story short, I ended up purchasing the 19" round bottom crucible from Pete. build a square wooden box around it and filled the box with mizzue cast-able. Turning my round pot into a square exterior pot, which is necessary for the upper heating chamber to rest on. The interior of the pot is a little wider then the upper heating chambers by about 3/4". So the lip created by the "crown" is half that on all sides as a result of centering the crown. Oh and for the ledge/arch gathering port. I was able to saw cut the disintegrating ledge free from the arch and used a cut 1" hard brick as a replacement for the ledge. Crucible was just over $500+ a few bags of cast-able. Saving about 1500 bucks. Its been working great.
Thanks again Pete for all the help and advice you shared during our phone conversation.

Philip
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Old 01-20-2015, 02:08 PM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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At this point, armed with new knowledge, you may want to abandon the crucible notion entirely on your next inevitable rebuild and use some of the AZS block that comes out of Minteq in Slippery rock Pennsylvania. Eddie Bernard at Wetdog has been working it successfully all these years I am happy to say. Basically, you need five bricks all prefired and hopefully machine edged. I think the notion of the square crucible could be addressed by them as well. I don't know if Eddie has some sort of exclusive on that but you might give him a call at Wetdog. AZS liners aren't for everyone and have many drawbacks. It has to be considered carefully.
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Old 01-20-2015, 02:55 PM
David Hopman David Hopman is offline
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Thanks for the info from both of you- I'll probably go one of these routes on my next rebuild.
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Old 01-20-2015, 05:47 PM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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AZS is not for the faint of heart. You need to not be shutting down or for that matter, changing temperature much at all. It is nasty difficult with thermal shock.
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Old 01-20-2015, 10:06 PM
Philip Yamron Philip Yamron is offline
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Pete. What would the advantage of Azs be? If its the square pot thing then I don't think it would sway my decision. To me square is a waste of glass and difficult to clean out when changing tank colors. If there are any additional aspects you think I should be considering I would be all ears.
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Old 01-21-2015, 07:44 AM
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Well, dropping a round crucible in a square hole is a waste in my mind but AZS is a two edged sword, lasting far longer if you don't abuse it, which is really easy to do yet on that level makes for a really foolish investment. AZS functions best in a continuous melter yet Bill Worcester ran a hemispherical tank of it and got good glass for a long time. It is quite expensive and can crack extremely easily. It needs a very high quality backing or the backing will become the failure point..
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Old 01-21-2015, 08:52 AM
Josh Bernbaum Josh Bernbaum is offline
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When I worked at Charlie Correll's place, we did a couple tank furnaces with AZS liners. I remember it took a couple months to order from the company that made them. They were in 3 sections, so two seams, and had curved inside "corners" which seems nicer than 90 degree angles where the floor meets the walls. And like Pete just pointed out about the backing, that same company also sent some sort of a crushed up AZS castable mix that we backed it up with on all 5 sides.
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Old 09-26-2017, 02:23 PM
charlie jenkins charlie jenkins is offline
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How was your solution?

Hey Philip,
Would you care to elaborate on your successes with the round pot in a square furnace solution?
I am considering replacing my 450# square pot in for a smaller round and are deciding between a few choices.
I normally line my cruc with 1.5" of mazzou (sp). I wonder how you handled the heat differential at the thin sides and back.
My current cruc. is 26w x 28d x 12h. I believe I need to use something no bigger than 26"dia, but should not be more than 5" taller, maybe 3".
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Old 09-26-2017, 03:17 PM
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At one point when I was still representing EC, I got to talking to the manager about making bricks. I think that could be done at Minteq as well. Have five AZS bricks made, just like the old days. Back them with a really high quality castable like Morco 95. It would last a long time if done carefully.
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Old 09-26-2017, 10:28 PM
Cecil McKenzie Cecil McKenzie is offline
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The old Toledo style furnaces that were used at University of Kansas were made of brick in a rectangular fashion but the floor sloped to the back of the furnace to make it easier to get all the glass out. Don't remember if they mortared it to the bottom or some how added wedge bricks as the furnace was being built.
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Old 10-02-2017, 12:47 PM
Philip Yamron Philip Yamron is offline
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Sure Charlie. It worked great! as far as I can tell. I sold the furnace in April of this year so I didn't get a chance to rebuild it and see if there had been any unseen effects. But all in all it worked as if hoped.
We melted nuggets not batch but it heated up at the same rate as fast as I can tell. ran in nonstop for 2+years I think. Had some pitting on the interior surface of the crucible after all that time running, to be expected. Only mistake I made that I know of was using two hard bricks for the sill replacement. Should have used one large piece or cast it. Over time the bricks seemed to shrink and pull away from each other. Otherwise when we put the furnace back together I treated the round pot casted in a square of mizzue just like the square crucible and put the insulation back the same. Fired it up the same. Everything worked fine for us. As I'm remembering I don't think we used mizzue underneath the crucible when we cast it. That is to say I didn't want to add any additional thickness of height to the crucible. I think I have a couple of pic I'll try to post.
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Old 10-02-2017, 01:04 PM
Philip Yamron Philip Yamron is offline
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Here's the only one I could find. Not sure how to rotate it sorry
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