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Old 03-26-2019, 11:04 AM
Shawn Everette Shawn Everette is offline
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Picking up casting glass

Hey guys, has anyone tried picking up a billet of a casting glass and working it in a hole? Any advice on Riechenbach vs. Gaffer vs. Bullseye, ect? I've worked bullseye hot before and remember hating it.

I'm working on a project that I'm wanting the optical transparency of casting glass, good workability, AND wanting to cold work facets without grinding through the color. I know I'm asking for a lot.

And yes Pete, I know, I know, I should just melt my own color to my desires, but that's not an option where I'm at right now.
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Old 03-26-2019, 01:06 PM
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Casting colors are an entirely different animal. Look to gaffer glass for the good ones. LiuliGongfang did some incredible castings one of which I saw on display at Corning about fifteen years back. It was a 6'8" five inch thick casting of Vishnu. Incredible detail in a pale amber. It's cost? Under 3K.... yow..

Chris Reese had the sweet deal at Schott being able to put molds etc under the extruder at Schott. What an opportunity!
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Old 03-26-2019, 01:29 PM
Shawn Everette Shawn Everette is offline
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I kinda new that it will be a different experience than some nice fresh furnace glass, was just checking to see if people had experience.

I was once demoing in a shop in upper WI that was melting Bullseye in their tank, I think it was their "cullet". Super stiff until you hit this break point and it turned to soup. Also don't think it liked the combustion environment, way cordy and yellow.

We ran System cutoffs for about a year in Madison, workable but optical snot. Since I can't get billets of that anymore not really an option anyway.

Was looking toward the Gaffer, I like the pallet better anyway.
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Old 03-26-2019, 02:56 PM
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Gaffer's the best. John knows his shit.
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Old 03-26-2019, 04:59 PM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is offline
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I have not done it but Id imagine that the gaffer is going to be quite soupy
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Old 03-26-2019, 06:35 PM
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*** I suspect you'll find gaffer colors in rod are quite different than those in casting.
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Old 03-27-2019, 07:07 AM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is offline
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Exclamation

Correct. But the casting glass is going to flow at lower temps than a clear soda line base glass.
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Old 03-27-2019, 07:41 AM
Shawn Everette Shawn Everette is offline
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I'm ok with soupy, more concerned with what it's going to do at an elevated temp in a combustion environment.
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Old 03-27-2019, 11:31 AM
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If you're running the lead casting materials, the conventional wisdom used to be that it had to be melted in a muffle furnace.
Croucher proved that to be wrong. Do however keep your flame neutral to oxidizing. Run lower temperatures than you would with soda limes.
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Old 03-27-2019, 12:18 PM
Shawn Everette Shawn Everette is offline
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Gotcha. I've got it running on a watlow to a adjustable blower so that should be achievable. Testing the proper pickup temp will be another major factor.
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Old 03-27-2019, 05:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawn Everette View Post
Gotcha. I've got it running on a watlow to a adjustable blower so that should be achievable. Testing the proper pickup temp will be another major factor.
Gaffer has technical info on casting glass, so it should be easy to sort out

http://www.gafferglassusa.com/index....technical_id=8
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Old 03-28-2019, 08:47 AM
Shawn Everette Shawn Everette is offline
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Yeah, I've gone over that. 800 seems like a way low anneal temp, I'm surprised the strain isn't lower then. I'll probably try picking up ~925-950 and see if that works, I'm not going to need a ton of glass for each part, but I'll give it a good soak anyway.

I also noticed that they singled out the uranium for a higher temp. It also said "lead-free glass that is thermally compatible with our blowing range of colours", which has me intrigued.
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Old 03-28-2019, 10:00 AM
Eric Trulson Eric Trulson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawn Everette View Post
It also said "lead-free glass that is thermally compatible with our blowing range of colours", which has me intrigued.
Where do you see that being said?

I went looking for that exact piece of info a couple weeks ago (I want to combine cast and blown glass for some work bouncing around in my head right now), and wasn't able to find any direct statement from Gaffer on combining their casting and blowing glasses. From just looking at the material properties, I assumed they wouldn't be compatible because of fairly different thermal expansion rates and annealing temperatures (although when one of the glass bodies is full of lead, maybe you can get away with a couple points of misfit)

If I just overlooked it somewhere, I'd love a link or pointer to it or something.

Last edited by Eric Trulson; 03-28-2019 at 10:08 AM.
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Old 03-28-2019, 10:40 AM
Shawn Everette Shawn Everette is offline
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I only found that on the uranium casting glass, different base than the rest of the billets. They have it listed with elevated anneal and casting temps as well. Sorry to get your hopes up.

Bullseye should be the same across the board, although some colors are going to cast way stiffer than others. Blowing wise it can be used, but it's not the greatest. You might hit up Kristin Thielking up at UW Stevens Point, I know they were running Bullseye through their whole shop so everything is compatible.

Spectrum is MIA in terms of billets or "rocks" at this point.
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Old 03-28-2019, 10:44 AM
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I recall Schott F2 as actually softening under 850F
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Old 03-28-2019, 11:06 AM
Shawn Everette Shawn Everette is offline
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Gaffer's listing the softening point at 1100F, but that seems high given the anneal is 800F. Last thing I want is a puddle for a pickup.
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Old 03-28-2019, 02:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawn Everette View Post
Yeah, I've gone over that. 800 seems like a way low anneal temp, I'm surprised the strain isn't lower then.
I blew some Schott lead crystal and annealed it fine at 800. I discovered this temp by doing a cane test, which is really what you should do to answer this question since even if you get the right temp off the web, every kiln is different and TCs are often off a bit.

Pull some pencil thin cane and take a 18" length and put it in your kiln at a 45 degree angle and run the kiln to 750, then raise it 25F every 30 min until it you get to a temp where it slumps. Then back down 25 degrees and there's your hold temp. Add the 25 degrees back on for your pickup temp.
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