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Old 03-12-2020, 11:21 AM
Shawn Everette Shawn Everette is offline
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aluminum angle for kiln

So has anyone one here ever used aluminum angle to frame out a kiln?

I'm amassing supplies for a >1cuf bench top flameworking annealer and I plan on moving it around the shop regularly, so the lightweight aspect has me intrigued. I know that it has about twice the rate of expansion as steel, but not expecting a terribly warm cold face with a 1050* service temp.
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Old 03-12-2020, 11:43 AM
John Riepma John Riepma is offline
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The toolroom that I managed used to make aluminum molds for molding urethane edge worksurfaces that were heated during the process to 140F to cure the urethane. The molds would grow approximately .095" per 12" when raised from 70F to 140F.
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Old 03-12-2020, 11:55 AM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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I did it once and it worked well. I really only did because the angle iron was free.
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Old 03-12-2020, 12:13 PM
Shawn Everette Shawn Everette is offline
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Good to know, going to cut and weight everything else first to see where I'm starting from. I'm aware I'd end up paying more for it, but I may be tempted with the weight difference vs steel. I know with my fabrication skills I'm going to allow for tolerances greater than 1/10".
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Old 03-12-2020, 12:33 PM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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I recall the stock being 5/16th inch. It drilled well and at that time I was using allthread to bind it. I recall the lengths being about 40 inches, perhaps more. .

It wasn't really free but at that time Los Alamos surplus was .10 lb. You could get machine lathes for that. The world was .10 lb. I got a lot of old West Controllers up there. They looked like they came out of Frankenstein's lab. A big old arrow that pointed at the temperature and they had this really loud "Clunk" when the solenoids kicked off.

It was only open Thursdays for one hour. They put us all on a chalk line and actually fired a little starting gun pistol and off we ran. The labs are still a very strange place.
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Old 03-12-2020, 02:35 PM
Shawn Everette Shawn Everette is offline
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There is some newer aluminum "braising" rod out that seems to work pretty well if you prep and heat it right.

When I was learning anodizing at penland I took a trip to the biltmore scrapyard, that place was a goldmine. Not quite .10lb, but certainly certainly cheaper than I was sourcing 6061. Just found a local place that has a separate "drop" warehouse, .60lb for steel and 3.00 for aluminium, this could get to be a problem.
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