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  #51  
Old 01-04-2019, 06:55 AM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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Empowering yourself doing it is worth the trouble. I still remember the first day I mixed a raw formula. It was Dudley's. Just an amazing feeling to realize that you really can do this. At that time, I mixed in an open barrel with my hands.

It opens up your world.
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  #52  
Old 01-04-2019, 09:01 AM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete VanderLaan View Post
Empowering yourself doing it is worth the trouble. I still remember the first day I mixed a raw formula. It was Dudley's. Just an amazing feeling to realize that you really can do this. At that time, I mixed in an open barrel with my hands.

It opens up your world.
Well.. the recipe obviously said “mix well by hand”
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  #53  
Old 01-04-2019, 09:24 AM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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It's really a great way to start. You can buy 20lbs of the materials at any pottery. You need a decent scale and a bucket. Mixing with your hands really does work, not as well as a mixer but it works. It just lets you know you can make your own glass.

To me, that's empowering.

You need Silica, soda ash, Potassium carb, calcium carb ,sodium nitrate and some antimony oxide. The antimony may not come from a pottery but Universal pigment certainly has it. Mix a formula, throw it in a pot that's at least 2200F, let it melt and go flat, add more, wash rinse repeat. It takes about 8 hours after the last charge. Keep it at least 2200F. You'll have glass the next day. Add metallic oxides for color at about .1 percent max.
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  #54  
Old 01-04-2019, 09:40 AM
Art Freas Art Freas is offline
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Wonder if one of these would work for mixing.
https://www.amazon.com/Scepter-04239...rb_top?ie=UTF8
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  #55  
Old 01-04-2019, 12:46 PM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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Henry Summa initially used something much like that in the early days when he was in New York. Cheap, fairly effective, takes up no space. Our little 7 inch crucibles don't cost much and if you prefer, Assay pots cost even less. My first pot furnace was built in a 55 gallon drum sawed off with a kast-o-lite 30 lid. Really low tech.

As to the mixer, the proof is in the pudding. It melts or it doesn't or something in between but the glass is talking to you. If you consider the cost of color rods compared to the cost of DYI , you'll be floored. Further, you'll make glass that doesn't look like everyone else's. The copper blue I'm using right now is absolutely electric and incredibly simple.

Read the stuff I wrote in Glassnotes IV on batching. It's a simply guide to doing it.
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  #56  
Old 01-05-2019, 01:41 PM
Lynn Read Lynn Read is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Patchen View Post
You might hit up George Bucquet--he makes some beautiful opaline glass.

http://www.georgebucquet.com/
Thanks for the Suggestion. I talked to him last week and he had some great advice and using MCP. Mono Calcium Phosphate.
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  #57  
Old 01-05-2019, 02:13 PM
Lynn Read Lynn Read is offline
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I wanted to share the results from my tests melting Phosphate white.

I am working with Spruce Pine Batch W/er87. Melting in an electric furnace with 50 lbs test melts at 2350 for about 4 hour melt, drop to 1900 for 4 hour soak and back up to working at 2130. That can be adjusted I think.

First tow melts with STPP Molecular FormulaNa5O10P3 Did not have any visible opalescence. My third test worked but was not an ideal system.

50 lbs SP batch
907 g STPP

Image #1 Full reheat - After a started Bubble is allowed to cool, the second gather and a full reheat caused the density to develop.

Image #2 Fresh gather cast and pressed. no reheat

Image #3 Spot heat with hot torch. My favorite so far

Image #4 started bubble allowed to cool and gathered with a limited reheat

Image #5 Spot heating with Torch on cast glass.

Amazing the variation heat has on this glass.


Does anyone have recommendations on getting the phosphate to strike on the cool down vs the reheat? I want to use this is casting /press molding but I do not have the option of reheating my castings without loosing the shape and texture. See image 5 for best results.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Full Reheat.jpg (26.6 KB, 38 views)
File Type: jpg Fresh gather casting and pressed, no reheats.jpg (29.4 KB, 35 views)
File Type: jpg Spot heats with hot torch.jpg (31.5 KB, 34 views)
File Type: jpg Gather over and limited reheat.jpg (26.5 KB, 32 views)
File Type: jpg Spot heat on cast glass.jpg (25.6 KB, 36 views)
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  #58  
Old 01-05-2019, 04:31 PM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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What Mark did in the "Ladder to the moon group was to cast the basic phosphate material and then press a "ladder into that mold. That caused a chill. Then the casting continued and the interface was opalescent.
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  #59  
Old 01-05-2019, 07:53 PM
Jordan Kube Jordan Kube is offline
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Bravo Lynn! That's the stuff!

Try removing your pieces from the mold after they've chilled and then hitting them with a hot torch on a turntable before boxing. Intense heat that won't necessarily cause you to lose your form.
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