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Old 04-11-2020, 03:47 PM
Chris Lowry Chris Lowry is online now
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Bernsteining

Ok what is Bernsteining? Is this really a way to add metal to glass? How is it done?
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Old 04-13-2020, 12:26 PM
Chris Lowry Chris Lowry is online now
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I guess no one knows what Iím talking about. I saw something on Alex Bernsteinís Instagram about his process but I didnít understand. Oh well
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Old 04-13-2020, 02:19 PM
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I know about Billy Bernstein's bears. I liked Van Gogh bear which had lost an ear in the processing.
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Old 04-13-2020, 05:42 PM
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The man was a great conductor, virtually electric!
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Old 04-13-2020, 06:38 PM
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Probably best to ask Alex for details but as he once explained it to me, after he grinds the glass, he sets up an angle grinder and steel oriented so the spray of sparks from the angle grinder are shooting directly onto the glass where he wants to add the metal/rust finish. As tiny particles of metal (as sparks) hit the glass they adhere. Not sure what he does from this point, but you get the idea. I think it's a distinctive characteristic of his work so I'd tread carefully.
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Old 04-13-2020, 08:18 PM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is offline
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I used to do it at rit and showed some of the other kids how to do it. Alex showed up a couple of years after me and I wonder if he learned it from them.

David explained it perfectly.

Pro tip - do it to the piece when itís on the pipe and hot.
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Old 04-14-2020, 03:26 AM
Chris Lowry Chris Lowry is online now
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Thanks for the pro tips... Iíll have to try it some day. So many tricks and so little time. Well actually I guess I have tons of time right now.
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Old 04-14-2020, 06:35 AM
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It also puts tiny cracks in the surface.
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Old 04-14-2020, 08:01 AM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is offline
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It never cracked any of my glass
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Old 04-14-2020, 12:33 PM
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For me the first time I saw this process done publicly was at the gas conference in Washington. I helped set up and organize the college demoís at the glass eye. Maybe some will remember the robot sculpture that some of the kids did? It was layered with metal from grinders while it was hot on the pipe. I donít think anyone had coined a name for it at the time. I have pictures of the piece somewhere. It was also the first year gas had flameworking demos so maybe that would ring a bell for some. I want to say it was 2002 but maybe someone will correct me on the dates.
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Old 04-14-2020, 12:36 PM
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You need to look at the joinery between the glass and the grit thrown by the grinder. If it's done with a magnifying glass, you can see these tiny cracks/checks. I'm always suspicious of stuff like that and how it behaves in the long run and for me long run is 100 years. Corning keeps the collection soundproofed and temperature controlled for good reasons.

It's just a curious material. It long been recognized that cut crystal is far more susceptible to thermal cracks one hundred years into process. You don't ever want to put water in a 100 year old cut bowl. It's highly likely to be cracked in a few hours.
I view any insult to the surface tension in that light. Just sayin'.

As a technique, I would think it to be far better to do it hot.
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Old 04-14-2020, 04:09 PM
Chris Lowry Chris Lowry is online now
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Pete, I think that is an opening to an interesting conversation.

Why should our glass last for 100 years?

We spend money to enjoy a movie or a play for two hours. We spend money to listen to music that lasts moments. We buy lots of expensive things that wonít last 4 years. Even our most precious possession, our home, needs continual reinvestment to last 100 years.

I do the best I can to make a safe well made product, but Iíd never go so far to say it will be around in 100 years.
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Old 04-14-2020, 04:14 PM
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This is just a guess, but I have always assumed there to be a chemical patina process involved in this technique. This is the first time I've heard how the iron is adhered to the surface. Looking at the finished pieces if he does it hot they would be brought back up to working temp after the surfaces are cold worked.

I've made some really nice rust finishes in the past using ferric nitrate. Two tablespoons in a quart of water with a pinch of potassium permanganate. The KMnO₄ can impart some nice veining with subtle purple hues.
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Old 04-14-2020, 05:37 PM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Lowry View Post
Pete, I think that is an opening to an interesting conversation.

Why should our glass last for 100 years?

We spend money to enjoy a movie or a play for two hours. We spend money to listen to music that lasts moments. We buy lots of expensive things that wonít last 4 years. Even our most precious possession, our home, needs continual reinvestment to last 100 years.

I do the best I can to make a safe well made product, but Iíd never go so far to say it will be around in 100 years.
*****
Well, the corning museum represents about 1200 Glassworkers over the centuries and they go back to 3500BC. It's a march for glass from some simple sand castings which turned immediately complex to follow a path which brings us forward to today.

It never occurred to me that I would be asked to join that group and it was the helix for me in my career. I've always tried to make the best work I could ever make. I did not falter from that. Be it in form or in chemistry. Now, when I go in the museum, I get to be part of that group. I simply can't explain why that's important beyond knowing while I lived, someone I valued other than me believed in the work. So, I'm fine, I got what I dreamed of way back when.

That's my answer.
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Old 04-15-2020, 08:31 AM
Shawn Everette Shawn Everette is offline
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I think it's cold process, I don't see a caster doing it hot. https://schantzgalleries.wordpress.c...iel-bernstein/

That being said, it would be fairly easy to dag a finished piece and put it through an electroformer to get that kind of look.

Hot wise Jussie Luketic(sp) was doing the grinder on the pipe technique when I was in Columbus.

Edit: Just found this , at the end there is a 2 second clip that looks like he's doing the grinder method on a cold piece. Seems risky on something that cast and cut, but to each their own.

Last edited by Shawn Everette; 04-15-2020 at 02:30 PM.
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Old 04-17-2020, 11:52 AM
Don Burt Don Burt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Lowry View Post
Pete, I think that is an opening to an interesting conversation.

Why should our glass last for 100 years?

We spend money to enjoy a movie or a play for two hours. We spend money to listen to music that lasts moments. We buy lots of expensive things that wonít last 4 years. Even our most precious possession, our home, needs continual reinvestment to last 100 years.

I do the best I can to make a safe well made product, but Iíd never go so far to say it will be around in 100 years.
I do like that discussion. The 100 year limit attitude would probably be different than most craftspeople who make any utilitarian artifact. Temporal performance arts endure too, The 'artistic experience' lasts only moments for a visitor to Corning or the Parthenon, but generations revisit it. if you see a play, it may have endured since Shakespeare's time. A poem, since the time of King David. If artifacts have intrinsic value at all, which is debatable, then durability might be thought of as a positive attribute. But you can make the point that doing a dance by yourself on an empty beach is a legitimate work of art. I want my stuff to be good because I'm afraid it might last more than 100 years and I don't want my kids to be annoyed with having to dispose of it. It's tricky.
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Old 04-18-2020, 09:09 PM
Marty Kremer Marty Kremer is offline
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I don't expect my work to be truly appreciated for at least 100 years...

gonna come back and check on it.
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