CraftWEB Hot Glass Talk  

Go Back   CraftWEB Hot Glass Talk > Hot Glass > General Hot Glass Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-08-2021, 02:16 PM
George Merkl George Merkl is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2021
Location: Vancouver, Washington
Posts: 1
George Merkl is on a distinguished road
Looking for equipment in the Pacific Northwest

We're looking to purchase a Skutt Kiln: Crucible Furnace - GM818-3CR and a Glory Hole in Washington or Oregon.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-08-2021, 02:20 PM
Pete VanderLaan's Avatar
Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
The Old Gaffer
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Chocorua New Hampshire
Posts: 22,499
Pete VanderLaan is on a distinguished road
George is rather new to all of this and I suggested he might be able to find a used skutt that would take a 14.5 inch pot. He was also looking about for used glory holes etc.

Be nice to him, he's quite new to this.
__________________
Where are we going and why am I in this basket?
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-09-2021, 11:31 AM
Greg Vriethoff's Avatar
Greg Vriethoff Greg Vriethoff is offline
Drone
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 2,274
Greg Vriethoff is on a distinguished road
Hi George,

Well, you're in the right place for Skutt products. They are based in Portland, OR, so shipping won't be an issue.

As far as a glory hole is concerned, perhaps Spiral Arts in Seattle(?).

Edit: It looks like you're looking for used equipment.

Do the obvious things like Craigslist for the Vancouver/Portland area. There is also a pottery business in Portland that supplies equipment and has classes. When I lived there they were teaching fusing and flameworking (no offhand glass blowing). They sell used equipment, but it appears their webpage is empty.

Contact Katie at Georgie's and reach out to Skutt in Portland. Skutt sometimes has used/refurbished kilns for sale.

Edit again: Georgie's Ceramic and Clay Co.
__________________
Temperature and time.

Last edited by Greg Vriethoff; 03-09-2021 at 11:42 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-09-2021, 04:19 PM
Charles Friedman Charles Friedman is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Seattle Wa
Posts: 619
Charles Friedman is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete VanderLaan View Post
George is rather new to all of this and I suggested he might be able to find a used skutt that would take a 14.5 inch pot. He was also looking about for used glory holes etc.

Be nice to him, he's quite new to this.
A Skutt kiln will not work for a 14" pot, by itself. It is not powerful enough. for blowing glass. However, it is a good starter shape, to build from. Up-grade the insulation and the heater elements by 3X.
__________________
"Glass will save the world from ourselfs" CharlesF
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-09-2021, 04:40 PM
Pete VanderLaan's Avatar
Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
The Old Gaffer
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Chocorua New Hampshire
Posts: 22,499
Pete VanderLaan is on a distinguished road
Skutt is a wealth of information that you want to hear., not need to hear When I last was at Corning with the Spruce Pine booth, it was next to the Skutt booth and I endured days of misinformation from it. We do sell pots and the 14 inch is the common one that gets sold to go with the 17 inch diameter skutt. The question for me always becomes whether the AMPS provided will drive the melt in a 14 which is 75 lbs. It seems to work albeit not in a way that would satisfy me, but it melts glass.

There are so many terrible ideas floating around in the world of wire melters, it's hard to know where to start. The worst one in my estimation is to fill the pot with cullet and then turn it on. Godawfully hard on the crucible.
Skutt was telling people that turning the thing up to 2380 continually was fine and that's certainly not true. It is great news if you make elements.
They'll fail readily but the company was pitching the kiln at boro makers melting pyrex. I tell buyers regularly that we don't make pots for boro melts and it's essentially ignored.

the fatal flaw with the pot and the wire melter is indeed that if you get it too hot ( above 2200F) regularly that the elements will indeed fail more regularly. When an element fails, the kiln falls to about 1300F, too cold to get the glass out of the pot so now you have to shut down with a half full pot, inviting failure for a different reason, It's endless but still based in ignorance. Wire kilns should run 3 elements.

Furnaces cost too damn much for the new glassworker. 30K and up is obscene yet the industry has switched to wanting that UL label which means nothing. Last year, I built a fully safety covered little melter with one 75 lb pot and two 15 lb pots for under 4K. It was fairly easy but it has no UL Label. Depending on where you live, that can be make or break but you're still going to bend over, or, use a Skutt kiln that performs poorly but has the label. From my point of view at fifty years in, it's profoundly frustrating to see making glass go down such a crippled path.

I wonder what would happen if a 3 day furnace building class got offered at GAS. Would it be attended, or be a bust. It's just not hard.
__________________
Where are we going and why am I in this basket?
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-11-2021, 12:33 PM
Greg Vriethoff's Avatar
Greg Vriethoff Greg Vriethoff is offline
Drone
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 2,274
Greg Vriethoff is on a distinguished road
I don't have experience with wire melters in a private studio setting. I mean I've worked out of them (i.e. gathers of clear) a handful of times at other people's studios, but I've never operated/maintained one outside of a factory setting.

My experience doesn't translate fully with what blowers want to do with them, but much of what Pete says is definitely true. The service cycles I was running were approximately 2-3 time per week. At the end I had four units (of various configurations) that were run at above 2200 for at least part of the melt cycle. Turnovers/rebuilds would occur anywhere from 6 to 12 weeks depending on the unit/use. Rebuilds involved replacing elements and crucible. After five years I guess I had a lot of experience. You can do the math if you want.

The wire melters are a good start for a beginner and/or weekend warrior. I know people that charge on a Thursday and come in to blow on Saturday with perfect glass. If you go low and slow you can make it work. If you decide to go pro you'd better plan on more infrastructure. I would really like to see less people looking for the next free lunch. I'm tired of this race to the bottom everywhere I look.

Everything I've made with these things was from soda lime cullet. I have no experience batching. I also have done nothing with boro.
__________________
Temperature and time.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:08 PM.


All published comments within these message boards are the opinions of its contributor and does not represent
the opinion(s) of the owner(s) of this website. Please see the Terms of Use file for more details.

Books to Help Artists Avoid Online Scams: Top 10 Email Scams | Social Media Scams

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CraftWEB.com. Opportunity Network. 2008. All Rights Reserved.