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Old 08-03-2018, 03:59 PM
Max Epstein Max Epstein is online now
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Air conditioning your shop?

OK. It's probably 135* here in FL with the furnace on. July-Aug is basically out of commission.

Is there any way to air condition the shop somewhat economically for a few months out of the year? Thoughts?
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Old 08-03-2018, 03:59 PM
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I've completely sweat thru my shirt and the furnace ain't even on.
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Old 08-03-2018, 05:12 PM
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set out a 55 gallon drum in the middle if the shop. Splurge and throw a big block of ice in it. Before every piece, stick your torso in the drum, then work. You'll be fine. When you're done, do it again.
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Old 08-03-2018, 06:59 PM
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If you were in an arid region I would recommend a swamp cooler. Here in the southeast introducing more humidity is counter-productive.

I'm planning on having ac in my little shop eventually. Just won't be using it while melting/blowing glass.

There are just some times of the year (depending also on where you are) that aren't conducive to glass blowing.
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Old 08-03-2018, 08:06 PM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is offline
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Anything is possible with enough cash
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Old 08-03-2018, 10:23 PM
Travis Frink Travis Frink is offline
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It's 90 by 9 am here recently. 95-100 in the afternoon and humid all day everyday. Welcome to subtropical living. Now you know why all the people in hot areas live a laid back, slow lifestyle. Jumping in the ocean or river is the only way to stay cool in summer here. I've done something like Pete suggested but wet clothes get heavy.

My friend has a restaurant ac in his small studio. It's cooler than outside in some areas. Spot coolers work too. I've also seen situations where cool air is pulled from the neighboring air conditioned room and directed by duct to blow on the back of your neck and body at the bench. All work. Getting a good, well-ventilated hood and heat shield above and in front of your glory/furnace will make a difference too.

Eat lots of salt. Good stuff with lots of minerals.
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Old 08-03-2018, 10:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Vriethoff View Post
If you were in an arid region I would recommend a swamp cooler. Here in the southeast introducing more humidity is counter-productive.

I'm planning on having ac in my little shop eventually. Just won't be using it while melting/blowing glass.

There are just some times of the year (depending also on where you are) that aren't conducive to glass blowing.
No humidity in the hot shop even here during the monsoon season dry as a bone. Swamp coolers and misters can do wonders. Just make sure you shut off the water cooling before you shut down the shop and it will stay nice and dry.
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Old 08-04-2018, 01:09 AM
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Hmmmmm alright never tried a swamp cooler. I'll check it out.

I also grabbed a portable ac unit thinking I would pipe it directly over the bench and next to the glory...
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Old 08-04-2018, 02:46 AM
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Suck it up, buttercup!
Air movement is key. Lots of fans moving air except on your piece at the bench. Great exhaust and hood over your furnace and glory hole.
I have seen shops that drop a 12" or so flex hose from an ac over the bench, but that only cools that one spot, you still spend a lot of time in front of the glory hole which isn't cooled and if you have fans, that cool air is blown away. We have a large swamp cooler, but don't use it anymore. Added more humidity to the air....
You can use a frozen neck cooler on yourself. I don't like things around my neck, but my assistant uses them.
Lots and lots of water and diluted Gatorade or Powerade.
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Old 08-04-2018, 05:07 AM
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Imagine you have to deal with that heat all year. 135 is hot really hot.
Does art increase in value if itís made with endurance at 135 deg.
Franklin
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Old 08-04-2018, 06:49 AM
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Back when GAS was held in Tucson AZ, Tom Philabaum had a swamp cooler over the marver and Lino was prepping to demonstrate, It was May as I recall and already over 100F outside. The studio was hot as well. Lino looked the swamp cooler over and asked Tom to turn it off.

What glass decidedly does not like is a breeze, any kind of breeze at all. It really pulls heat off of a piece. It's worth remembering.

Again, we insulated our hood and all the tools are under the hood. It is consistently the same temp inside and outside with it occasionally cooler inside mid day.

Do some obvious stuff.
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Old 08-04-2018, 10:48 AM
Steven O'Day Steven O'Day is offline
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I tried a swamp cooler in my shop in New Mexico. It worked well if you were away from the hood but the radiant heat from the equipment combined with the added humidity made it uncomfortable to work at the glory and bench.
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Old 08-04-2018, 11:11 AM
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If you enclose and insulate your hood, can you get away with fewer air changes (and therefore more AC) in the studio? Or is that still not a good idea?

I'd imagine you might need some sort of make up air in the hood too to keep "equilibrium"



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Old 08-04-2018, 11:26 AM
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Beware the swamp cooler.

Unless you are very diligent on maintaining cleanliness in the water (i.e frequent changes or some chemical treatment), they will in deed turn into swamps.

They have been linked to some nasty outbreaks of Legionaires disease, mould and a plethora of other very nasty airborne ailments that are difficult to treat.
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Old 08-04-2018, 11:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Huntrods View Post
Beware the swamp cooler.

Unless you are very diligent on maintaining cleanliness in the water (i.e frequent changes or some chemical treatment), they will in deed turn into swamps.

They have been linked to some nasty outbreaks of Legionaires disease, mould and a plethora of other very nasty airborne ailments that are difficult to treat.
Ewwwwww. I just had to throw 2 office chairs out at the shop due to mold :/
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Old 08-04-2018, 11:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Franklin Sankar View Post
Imagine you have to deal with that heat all year. 135 is hot really hot.
Does art increase in value if itís made with endurance at 135 deg.
Franklin
You're in a spot even worse than Florida lol. I don't envy you at all! Here in North Florida we actually get "winters" which are quite lovely for glassblowing

Yes but only if it's modern art. Christopher Burden's "Shoot" comes to mind I always get his name confused with Tyler Durden but they may be one in the same.
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Old 08-04-2018, 11:46 AM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is offline
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I have a sweet AC unit that cools my gallery. It can be 95 outside and the gallery can be a nice cool 74 degrees, which in my opinion has 100% helped me sell a lot of glass this month as people are very comfortable.
Yesterday I gave some thought to what it would take to cool a hotshop and I believe you would have to re write the unspoken rules of how to cool one. For example, You would certainly need to have a good insulated hood and you would have to also have a duct system above the flue of your furnace, above your pipe warmer and especially above the front of your glory hole to capture all of that waste heat. From there, the duct lets it run outside your wall to the outside. This would then just make your equipment radiators of sorts and the exhaust fan inside of your hood would be able to be smaller and I would make it a variable speed.
From there, I would have a large central AC unit on the roof that pumped in cold air into the hotshop. The key is that every CFM you pull through your exhaust fan would be air you would have to push in from the AC unit. I would have your ac ducts right above the bench and in front of the glory hole.. you won't cool the whole room, but you will definitely feel cool dry air.

You would burn a lot of electricity but you would also be able to work more, thus hopefully earning much more income than your overhead would be.

Since I am about to retire my mongo 20 amp blower, I am considering simply re working where that air goes and duct it directly above my bench, glory hole and Maybe in front of the bench so I would have a constant high volume of cool air...
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Old 08-04-2018, 01:14 PM
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The late great Sue Glass didn't have A/C in her studio, but the swimming pool right outside the door more than made up for it.

(Whoa! I just realized I'm now the same age Sue was when she died suddenly in '05.)
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Old 08-04-2018, 01:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eben Horton View Post
I have a sweet AC unit that cools my gallery. It can be 95 outside and the gallery can be a nice cool 74 degrees, which in my opinion has 100% helped me sell a lot of glass this month as people are very comfortable.
Yesterday I gave some thought to what it would take to cool a hotshop and I believe you would have to re write the unspoken rules of how to cool one. For example, You would certainly need to have a good insulated hood and you would have to also have a duct system above the flue of your furnace, above your pipe warmer and especially above the front of your glory hole to capture all of that waste heat. From there, the duct lets it run outside your wall to the outside. This would then just make your equipment radiators of sorts and the exhaust fan inside of your hood would be able to be smaller and I would make it a variable speed.
From there, I would have a large central AC unit on the roof that pumped in cold air into the hotshop. The key is that every CFM you pull through your exhaust fan would be air you would have to push in from the AC unit. I would have your ac ducts right above the bench and in front of the glory hole.. you won't cool the whole room, but you will definitely feel cool dry air.

You would burn a lot of electricity but you would also be able to work more, thus hopefully earning much more income than your overhead would be.

Since I am about to retire my mongo 20 amp blower, I am considering simply re working where that air goes and duct it directly above my bench, glory hole and Maybe in front of the bench so I would have a constant high volume of cool air...
We did exactly what Eben envisages here in a studio in Auckland, New Zealand 25 years ago. It gets reasonably hot and humid here in the summer, but not as bad as lots of places in the States. I can't emphasize enough what a huge difference it made to our work output and general studio comfort. The extra cost of the electricity was insignificant compared to the extra product we could generate. To this day I'm still surprised almost no studios have A/C air blowing down on their glory hole and bench workstations. You don't know what you are missing if you haven't done it!!
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