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  #26  
Old 02-01-2018, 02:34 PM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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Insurance companies love sprinklers and so do fire departments. They do love sheet rock too and they also like metal sort of. Metal expands about 8% when it goes up to 800F which is not hard to do and can pretty much destroy itself it not built in very slick ways. If I had to deal with a landlord, I'd sprinkler. You'll get great fire rating. I think you need a professional service to install it.

What fire departments really love is people who seek them out for answers regarding fire safety. They like lock boxes. They like pre plans. Go make an appointment with your fire marshal and tell him or her what you want to do. They don't bite unless it's after the fact.
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Old 02-02-2018, 02:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete VanderLaan View Post
Insurance companies love sprinklers and so do fire departments. They do love sheet rock too and they also like metal sort of. Metal expands about 8% when it goes up to 800F which is not hard to do and can pretty much destroy itself it not built in very slick ways. If I had to deal with a landlord, I'd sprinkler. You'll get great fire rating. I think you need a professional service to install it.

What fire departments really love is people who seek them out for answers regarding fire safety. They like lock boxes. They like pre plans. Go make an appointment with your fire marshal and tell him or her what you want to do. They don't bite unless it's after the fact.
So... you're saying I could *potentially* make an old wooden warehouse work with enough sheet rock?
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  #28  
Old 02-02-2018, 05:17 PM
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with rock and sprinklers, you bet.
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Old 02-02-2018, 07:35 PM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is online now
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a friend of mine built a studio in a historic brick mill building, but the space had wood floors and wood ceilings. He laid down a pad of cinder block style pavers for the furnace and glory hole and his bench was on the wood floor. a sheet of steel would catch any scraps that he cut off and landed on the floor. A big steel hood and exhaust fans vents all the heat.
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Old 02-02-2018, 08:32 PM
Travis Frink Travis Frink is offline
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Many studios here in Japan are in wood framed buildings. It can be done but should be planned and built carefully. Keeping heat away from walls, ceilings, joists, etc should be a major consideration with or without just relying on sheet rock/drywall. As an example, a major cause of house fires here is having the kitchen stove too close to the wall in cramped kitchens. Years of cooking dries out the wood in the wall through the sheet rock and one day things start burning inside the wall (is "pyrolysis" the correct term?). It's been discussed on this forum at length. I've seen a studio fire start from a poorly designed flue passage through a wall in a wood building. It could have been averted by thinking ahead and planning where and how the flue would exit the building.
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Old 02-03-2018, 08:56 AM
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Always remember that it's only gasses that burn. Firewood doesn't burn but it gasses off and the gas does burn. True in a studio as well. Both Victor Chiarizia and Steven Weinberg's fires were pyrolitic in nature with one lighting off beams in the floor below. You can see pyrolisis at work if you put too high a wattage bulb in a light fixture. The fixture begins to blacken. Glass furnaces are ALWAYS underinsulated in the floor.
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  #32  
Old 02-03-2018, 01:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eben Horton View Post
a friend of mine built a studio in a historic brick mill building, but the space had wood floors and wood ceilings. He laid down a pad of cinder block style pavers for the furnace and glory hole and his bench was on the wood floor. a sheet of steel would catch any scraps that he cut off and landed on the floor. A big steel hood and exhaust fans vents all the heat.

I did the paver route over plywood/hardwood in my first indoor studio. This was in 2007 (?). When we moved the furnace to the new cast concrete floor a year later, we discovered that we had charcoaled the plywood that was over the old hardwood flour under the furnace. Like, totally charcoal. The hardwood under that was untouched.

We fixed it (replace the plywood) in the night so no one was aware but it CERTAINLY opened my eyes about pyrolysis. This was in a well insulated wire melter (3" off the floor, enough to get a pallet jack under it) that had at LEAST 5 inches of fiber under the hot liner.

We also were sprinklered. Which was exciting when my studio mate ignited some cardboard boxes that were too close to her fusing kiln.

I don't recommend a glass furnace over a wood floor. I really don't.

BSD
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  #33  
Old 02-03-2018, 01:52 PM
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separation of 24 inch to combustibles is pretty much the case in code for good reason. 3" is really close. It's part of why most furnaces are built on steel stands. I never let my floors get closer than about 12 inches, but that's over concrete.
Stick a thermocouple down there. It's an eye opener.
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  #34  
Old 02-09-2018, 01:18 PM
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Thanks for the informative replies. I love this place.
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  #35  
Old 02-09-2018, 02:09 PM
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I was struck a bit today when I considered the studio and how it's built- wood out of necessity given that I own a forest and log it. But throw that aside and think more on your shop this way:

Build it like you can't spare expense. Make the absolute best you can be it the equipment or the work. Mark Peiser had this absolutely right. He said "It's absolutely OK to make the doughnuts but you have to make the very best doughnuts you can."

I'm having this private conversation with Scott Benefield which we frequently do. Scott is the best historian of glass that I know AND respect. Yesterday I kicked out at him "Who from the '60-90's from the private studios has been included in the Corning collection. Who would you include who's not there? He indicated that Corning had a "Fine Disdain" for the private shops. I love the way he writes.

It's ongoing for me. Here's an example: Paul Harrie. Paul was really an exceptional designer if you looked carefully. He died last year- gone. I have hosts of others but I'll leave them unnamed right now. My list isn't quite the point. It seems that Academia drew all the attention but by 1990 the private shops were really driving the show. Academia seems to be in the museums and certainly in the coffee table books where no one researches anything at all. . It helps show those programs are worth paying for or so they believe. Two aspects come to mind. One is personal promotion and it's sadly really important. Don't do it and toil in obscurity. The other is what galleries carry your work and that too is important but is overshadowed by how much you charge for your work. If it's too low priced, they'll never handle it since it fails to meet the business model.

But it still leaves me with those makers. There are about 1500 glassmakers represented in Corning. That's not a lot for a trade that has run over 5,000 years since those egyptian coil castings. . Who really innovated, made first class stuff and was passed over? It's a tough crowd.
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Old 02-09-2018, 04:20 PM
Jordan Kube Jordan Kube is offline
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I, too, love Scott's writing. It's well worth the time to go his website and read through his archive of articles.
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  #37  
Old 02-09-2018, 04:38 PM
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you too have an excellent overview my friend.
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