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Old 02-11-2018, 07:45 PM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is online now
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Hot shops in narrow spaces

I found a neat potential studio space here in town. The space has a 1000 square foot garage bay with 20 foot high ceilings. Awesome, right?! Well the catch is that space is only about 15 feet wide, or wide enough for a big garage door and about 3 feet to one side of it. My furnace would have to be all the way at the back wall and then glory holes would have to be along the long wall. It would be a bit awkward but I think it would work. Like blowing glass in a submarine.

Does anyone have experience with a set up like this? It would be great for pulling cane.
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Old 02-11-2018, 07:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eben Horton View Post
I found a neat potential studio space here in town. The space has a 1000 square foot garage bay with 20 foot high ceilings. Awesome, right?! Well the catch is that space is only about 15 feet wide, or wide enough for a big garage door and about 3 feet to one side of it. My furnace would have to be all the way at the back wall and then glory holes would have to be along the long wall. It would be a bit awkward but I think it would work. Like blowing glass in a submarine.

Does anyone have experience with a set up like this? It would be great for pulling cane.
The old studio at Tyler was long and skinny like that.... lots of good glass came out of there.
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Old 02-11-2018, 08:08 PM
Mike McCain
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The furnace here is directly through a doorway, so one is obligated to walk backwards about six feet with a fresh gather. It's a whole room made into a heat shield and it works. I actually prefer a smaller pad, as long as the bench isn't shoved into a corner. I also appreciate the outside blower.
Feng shui.
You might chalk out the footprint of all your equipment and mime your way through a blow session to see if its a good fit.
We run out to the parking lot to pull cane; makes for a flash mob experience that the tourists seem to dig.

Last edited by Mike McCain; 02-11-2018 at 10:58 PM. Reason: Foot-in-mouth disease
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Old 02-11-2018, 09:05 PM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is online now
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Quote:
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The old studio at Tyler was long and skinny like that.... lots of good glass came out of there.
Good to know..

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike McCain View Post
The furnace here is directly through a doorway, so one is obligated to walk backwards about six feet with a fresh gather. I actually prefer a smaller pad, as long as the bench isn't shoved into a corner. Feng shui.
You might chalk out the footprint of all your equipment and mime your way through a blow session to see if its a good fit.
We run out to the parking lot to pull cane; makes for a flash mob experience that the tourists seem to dig.
Through a doorway?! that is interesting. At my current studio, i don't even bother pulling cane inside. I do it outside along the side walk. it creates quite an attraction as cars and people go by. I have had kids drive over cane pulls on their bikes by accident. ( lesson learned.. never delay in bringing that cane back in side once its pulled.)
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Old 02-11-2018, 09:05 PM
Travis Frink Travis Frink is online now
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It works. Most of the studios I've seen and been in here are that size or smaller. Some things I've seen in these places:

Keeping the shop cool and having things arranged to allow smooth movement can be a major issue so forethought on placing everything will be key in whether you really like working there or just deal with it cuz that's what you have. Being surrounded by hot equipment is one sure way to be unhappy in summer. I sweat like crazy in the dead of winter in one rental studio I use regularly that has similar dimensions to the one you're looking at but poor layout. It's famous as one of the hotter studios in humid Japan....

If you can put the gas "plumbing" and blower for your furnace behind it instead of on the side, it seems to create more space. Having the burner and recouperator on the side only seems to add and extra 12-16" on my friend's setup but it seems like a lot more than setups with the plumbing on the side. He also has his annealer on top of the furnace and I REALLY like that. Very easy ergonomically to put things away and you don't get singed facial or arm hair every time either. This might not work if you're making big, long, solid, etc work though.

Having the blower and as much much plumbing as possible under the glories is also a major space saver. One friend did that and then insulated the frame under the glory with sound proof insulation and it is really quiet.

A double ended glory (open on both ends) aligned parallel with the long wall of the building can give you 2 glories for the space of one if you need that. A well isulated door with no opening can be used to close up one end when you only need one opening. If you have multiple glories, having them on wheels so those not in use can be moved out of the way is another way to use space more efficiently.
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Old 02-12-2018, 08:33 AM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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My shop on canon road was only 11 feet wide x 28 feet long and it did get interesting. I actually set my bench up outside when working. The annealer was along the back 11 foot wall. Being aware of the location of the cold end of a blowpipe was important. That furnace had 2 24 inch pots in it so it wasn't small. It was my first moly. Ventilation was superb in the ceiling.

But, I also had the other studio out in La Cienega where we did all of our coldwork, shipping, books, blah blah blah. I would not really want to do it again. but if necessary... I mean having the blowing right by the gallery was like shooting fish in a tuna can.
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Old 02-12-2018, 10:21 AM
Dave Bross Dave Bross is offline
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I used to get it done in 1/2 of a 2 car garage. Small equipment though.


http://www.davebross.com/GlassTech/w...nacebeads.html
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Old 02-12-2018, 10:37 AM
Max Epstein Max Epstein is offline
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I would *not* recommend it.

My shop is almost exactly the same dimensions, 1000 square feet, 15ft wide, 60 or so feet long. 25ft ceilings.

It really depends on how your shop and business are set up. We have the furnace and workshop up front and gallery in the back (we get foot traffic in the front quite often, sometimes 100 people during busy events in the art park, with no place to put all of them, let alone effectively sell anything). Also try and watch your product in a unit that long if you are working solo and have people coming in off the street.

15ft wide is *just* enough space for the workshop. BUT we have to rope the front half off, as you cannot safely have foot traffic in a space that narrow. That means, you have to walk AROUND BACK to get to the gallery.

The gallery has all the shipping and storage (which becomes a problem) as well. I don't have enough room to store all my crap, both machinery in the workshop and in the back gallery.

So.... if you rarely have people visit, particularly customers, and are just going to use it to blow glass, it can and will work. As soon as you add more than 5-10 people it becomes challenging. It's a blessing in disguise that I have to move to a new location. I really want a minimum of 2000 square feet. I think things would flow a lot better if the dimensions were reversed in the current setup, 60 feet wide, 15ft long.

I'll grab some pictures when I head over today.
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Old 02-12-2018, 11:51 AM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is online now
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Originally Posted by Max Epstein View Post
I would *not* recommend it.

My shop is almost exactly the same dimensions, 1000 square feet, 15ft wide, 60 or so feet long. 25ft ceilings.

It really depends on how your shop and business are set up. We have the furnace and workshop up front and gallery in the back (we get foot traffic in the front quite often, sometimes 100 people during busy events in the art park, with no place to put all of them, let alone effectively sell anything). Also try and watch your product in a unit that long if you are working solo and have people coming in off the street.

15ft wide is *just* enough space for the workshop. BUT we have to rope the front half off, as you cannot safely have foot traffic in a space that narrow. That means, you have to walk AROUND BACK to get to the gallery.

The gallery has all the shipping and storage (which becomes a problem) as well. I don't have enough room to store all my crap, both machinery in the workshop and in the back gallery.

So.... if you rarely have people visit, particularly customers, and are just going to use it to blow glass, it can and will work. As soon as you add more than 5-10 people it becomes challenging. It's a blessing in disguise that I have to move to a new location. I really want a minimum of 2000 square feet. I think things would flow a lot better if the dimensions were reversed in the current setup, 60 feet wide, 15ft long.

I'll grab some pictures when I head over today.
Thanks for this Max. This is great info.
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Old 02-12-2018, 04:10 PM
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Make sure that you just don't "settle" for an available space. This is the opportunity to take the leap and build your "last" studio that has everything that you need
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Old 02-12-2018, 06:34 PM
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Knowing what I know, I agree with mark. Look for a place where you can make your product and if possible, get an evening restaurant trade. At your best, you're entertainment. Do it. Be affable . Make the bank deposits in the morning.
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Old 02-12-2018, 06:55 PM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is online now
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I agree Mark. Iíll give you the scoop on it in Philly.
My master plan with this space is to try to grow my wholesale business to the point that I can be anywhere and then do the home studio thing.

I am not sure if I was clear but this space does have the long 1000 square feet of hot shop space, and it also has a 2500 sqft Gallery space and another 500 square ft of space on top of the gallery for storage.

I only wish that the hot shop space was 5 feet wider.
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Old 02-14-2018, 04:12 PM
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Excuse the mess, we are doing some cleaning while we finish up the new furnace

As you can see... everything fits. And works. The bench is a tad too close, so you will be backing into it from time to time, unless it goes all the way against the wall, but that doesn't feel amazing especially if you have some sort of hand torch etc.

I think the best setup is furnace in the middle, glory hole on either side, and then an annealer, or maybe have the annealer in the middle with the furnace so there are 2 separate work spaces.

5 extra feet would feel great. It's cramped, but functional, especially for a small shop like mine.

I'm with Pete... this is a performance art. Are there windows so people can observe you from the gallery? Or off the street? My plan is to put in a bar with a partition between so I can create a little hangout spot and take their money and hopefully not have to rely 1000% on my glass to keep me going. I also have a high-end restaurant developer who is interested in some sort of partnership for his next location. I don't think I'm quite into that (yet) as I don't want a partner. I get all sort of traffic in a college town so I don't think it will be hard for me to create a "Hot Spot" that brings people back oh, and you gotta pass a breathalyzer to do any sort of workshop, lol. I'm also now based next to 2 hotels and near the expensive student housing, hence the plethora of sorority girls I get on a daily basis. Woe is me

https://imgur.com/a/Kt01e

I also put the safety equipment on the side of the furnace which frees up a little space. You just need a longer hood. My current all-in-one has an annealer up top like Travis described on his friend's setup, which was neat for a while but not really accurate. I toyed with the idea of putting some elements there to actually help control the temp but said f*** it and bought a couple and haven't cracked a piece since.
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Old 02-14-2018, 04:40 PM
charlie jenkins charlie jenkins is offline
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try this

Hi Eban,
I'll chime in a similar studio story.
Our first studio in Oakland CA was 50x15x18h and it worked just fine.
We put our furnace(elec-400lbs)and annealers (stacked) in the middle of the room opposite each other, and the two glorys on each end pointed away from the furnace.

It was tight and we needed to build a loft for storage and break into another room for a gallery, but the cold shop was in one corner and the door to the hall in another. At the other end a double door opened out to a lot for parking and outside storage. And a big fan in the window to pull air through.

Terrill and out grew that studio in 7 years and moved to something that sometimes seems just too huge, but its fun to spread out.
Also...this was in Cali where weather was less of a concern and we could have the doors open all day every day....

Good luck,
C
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Old 02-14-2018, 08:57 PM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is online now
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Max, thanks for the pictures. Thatís a happy looking studio.

Iím thinking that I can squeeze my furnace, pipe warmer and gloryhole at the back end of the shop along the back wall. Iím currently working in a 500 sqft hot shop thatís basically a 2 car garage so I wouldnít think that that narrow space would be an issue. This studio move is going to double my rent which scares me to death. I made it through the Great Recession thanks to some seriously hard core scrimping and determination, but if we go through another economic collapse and I have a high rent to cover I donít know.. my knees start to buckle thinking about it.
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Old 02-14-2018, 10:07 PM
Drew Hine Drew Hine is offline
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??

My shop is 18í the hot shop and 15 Ď for the rest. It 65í long. It is always a difficult challenge. We are always constantly moving things around to find space. If you donít mind a mess then it works great. Otherwise what are the opportunity costs from re organizing all the time. We are a production shop it always looks crazy as our front of house is dedicated to a gallery and packing and shipping, and sometimes storage when someone shows up unannounced it becomes a stressful situation. I would not recommend it but it has worked for my wife and i for the last ten years. Good luck.
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Old 02-15-2018, 08:42 PM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is online now
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Nice equipment Drew ! I like how your furnace is at an angle. Thatís what I did in my current studio and it makes seems to appease the feng shui gods
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