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Old 12-11-2017, 01:00 AM
Chris Lowry Chris Lowry is offline
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HXTL as clear coat

Anyone have experience using HXTL as clear coat? Still trying to find the best product to seal a sandblasted surface. Not sure it would really work on a vertical surface.

How about pumice on a sandblasted surface... what type of pumice do you use? Rough, fine? Iíve tried a little but it sure is messy.
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Old 12-11-2017, 06:21 AM
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Hxtal is high gloss but it's not hard enough in my estimation. It's also incredibly expensive for that usage
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Old 12-11-2017, 07:08 AM
Kenny Pieper Kenny Pieper is offline
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I have know people to use Hxtal, oil, lacquer, armor all, His glass Works has their own sort of product. Chris the problem with all of these types of products is that it is not permanent. If someone cleans the piece with a solvent it will will change the surface. This might be O.K. for a large sculpture that is not going to be handled much like a Rick Beck, other wise pumice is a good way to go. I would start out with a medium size like 00. I know a couple of people around here that do that.
I use acid but.....
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Old 12-11-2017, 07:36 AM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is offline
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I like mineral oil
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Old 12-11-2017, 07:43 AM
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I like heated baby oil but Kenny is correct. It needs reapplications. It also draws dust.
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Old 12-11-2017, 08:53 AM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete VanderLaan View Post
I like heated baby oil but Kenny is correct. It needs reapplications. It also draws dust.
True. I have also sprayed on clear laquer with great results.
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Old 12-11-2017, 09:12 AM
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In painting classic cars using lacquer, they always do multiple coats as in eight or nine. That might help.
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Old 12-11-2017, 10:56 AM
Chris Lowry Chris Lowry is offline
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Kenny that is my problem, had to talk the customer into reapplying. With light colors or clear you really donít see it but with black glass you see every little flaw in the surface.

I guess I have to play with pumice more, itís just so messy.

Thanks everyone
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Old 12-11-2017, 10:57 AM
Chris Lowry Chris Lowry is offline
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Iíd also like to learn about acid but I just donít have the space to be safe.
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Old 12-11-2017, 11:51 AM
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HF is interesting stuff. It's easy to buy and it's generally illegal to dispose of it. Your first mistake is generally your last mistake far too frequently. It also is far more effective on lead glasses. Soda Limes? not so much.

Even in the Shanghai shop where Eveline built the slickest HF shop I've ever seen, it took six months to get it passed by inspectors.
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Old 12-11-2017, 01:34 PM
Kenny Pieper Kenny Pieper is offline
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I know this guy named Bob (we will leave it at that) and he gets a great surface with ammonia by-chloride. Sandblast first and then suspend in a solution of ammonia by-chloride dissolved in water. I have never tried it but it looks good on his work.
I like these mechanical solutions much better then just applying something to the surface. They will never last. When I first started experimenting with these type of satin surfaces I used some of the topical solutions and never felt good about having to give care instructions (ie how to reapply) with the work.
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Old 12-11-2017, 03:36 PM
Marc Carmen Marc Carmen is offline
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If you're going to use some kind of sealer its nice to do a little light sanding first just to take the tooth off the surface. It makes the surface much less scratch and scuff prone. I usually use a maroon scotchbrite pad or a grey 3M sanding sponge.

What I'd like to know is if anyone out there is using some kind of low temp overspray on blasted surfaces and then re-annealing them to seal the surface. I wonder if a low temp borax based solution would work. The fused glass world uses a fluxing overspray that fixes surface devit but it needs to be fired at 1300 or so.
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Old 12-11-2017, 03:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenny Pieper View Post
I know this guy named Bob (we will leave it at that) and he gets a great surface with ammonia by-chloride. Sandblast first and then suspend in a solution of ammonia by-chloride dissolved in water. I have never tried it but it looks good on his work.
I like these mechanical solutions much better then just applying something to the surface. They will never last. When I first started experimenting with these type of satin surfaces I used some of the topical solutions and never felt good about having to give care instructions (ie how to reapply) with the work.
******
Getting ammonium bifluoride in perspective. I used it at one point and it worked fairly well on soda limes. At one point I wanted to neutralize the solution and I had about three gallons in the booth. I added some soda ash and it jumped out of the booth at me about a foot. - no exaggeration. It's still a fluorine compound and it's still very volatile.
I would be quite interested in hearing solutions involving a reanneal and borax. I would think it would have to get hotter than that. I don't like borax in general although I know how much it gets used.
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Old 12-11-2017, 05:16 PM
Chris Lowry Chris Lowry is offline
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Well on my cast work a reanneal around 1100 gives an awesome surface to sandblasting but a blown piece would be a little difficult. Iíve thought of picking a piece back up, taking it to 1100 and then back to anneal but it seems like a lot of work. Plus if you go over temp you loose the surface.
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Old 12-11-2017, 05:59 PM
Travis Frink Travis Frink is online now
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Pumice is pretty commonly used here as a prepolish.
Get the wheel turning away from you inside a hood to catch the slop and apply pumice slurry frequently. Some kind of removable flange or plastic piece to stop slurry flying back at you. With the right setup it's not too messy.

I know people here who sandblast with #600 sand and then do pumice with a big horsehair wheel. It's pretty close to an acid etched finish. #600 is "dusty" when sandblasting so a respirator and proper ventilation/particulate control would be an issue... but it looks great.

Some people claim they take sandblasted work back to a gloss finish with that method but it "takes patience" I.e. A LONG time. It depends on how much work you want to put into it in addition to knowing/learning all the tricks to overcoming all the books, crannies, undercuts and other hiccups. I imagine Big solid work might need a different method if it's too heavy to hold for long periods.
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Old 12-11-2017, 06:22 PM
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I'm wondering if it would be possible to thin down clear Vitrea 160, spray, and bake. They seem durable.
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Old 12-11-2017, 06:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travis Frink View Post
Pumice is pretty commonly used here as a prepolish.
Get the wheel turning away from you inside a hood to catch the slop and apply pumice slurry frequently. Some kind of removable flange or plastic piece to stop slurry flying back at you. With the right setup it's not too messy.

I know people here who sandblast with #600 sand and then do pumice with a big horsehair wheel. It's pretty close to an acid etched finish. #600 is "dusty" when sandblasting so a respirator and proper ventilation/particulate control would be an issue... but it looks great.

Some people claim they take sandblasted work back to a gloss finish with that method but it "takes patience" I.e. A LONG time. It depends on how much work you want to put into it in addition to knowing/learning all the tricks to overcoming all the books, crannies, undercuts and other hiccups. I imagine Big solid work might need a different method if it's too heavy to hold for long periods.
****
Use coarser pumice
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Old 12-12-2017, 01:24 PM
Steven O'Day Steven O'Day is offline
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For small areas paint on enamel flux and fire to 1050. Might be shinier than you want. Contains lead. Brushstrokes tend to show on large areas.
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Old 12-18-2017, 08:50 PM
Andy Stenerson Andy Stenerson is offline
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A friend is swearing by 'sugar sand' in the sandblaster. Says it leaves a dull sheen, like 400 silicon carbide.
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Old 12-18-2017, 11:50 PM
Chris Lowry Chris Lowry is offline
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What is sugar sand
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Old 12-19-2017, 08:38 PM
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It's a type of blasting media.

I'll sometimes follow-up with glass beads after SiC. Softens it a little. Regardless of what you use for grit you have to follow-up with some kind of seal. Unless you go acid, and then there's all the challenges that go with that as have been mentioned.
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Old 12-27-2017, 09:23 AM
Gary Genetti Gary Genetti is offline
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Tung oil drys hard and is resistant to solvents. It is the basic ingredient in the Lust'er product. It can still be bought straight no thinner. Takes at least 6 hours to dry.
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Old 01-05-2018, 03:15 PM
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Has anyone tried straight Tung oil as a sealant?
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Old 01-05-2018, 03:41 PM
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It has been used and it's in this thread as well. I've seen good results.
In almost any of the apps of material, I find it best done hot since it permeates the spaces in the blasting.

I did get great results with the ammonium bifluoride booth but I view it as risky. My general take on craftweb is that people continue to fail to appreciate how good ventilation really needs to be.
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Old 01-05-2018, 07:48 PM
Chris Lowry Chris Lowry is offline
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Just saw a bunch of Preston Singletaryís work, whatever he is using looks nice.
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