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Old 05-30-2012, 08:42 PM
Josh Bernbaum Josh Bernbaum is offline
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Yellow Iron oxide?

Anyone tried using yellow iron oxide instead of the red iron oxide?
Hoping to throw some in with my next transparent color melt, but wondering
if I should be expecting a similar green that the red iron oxide makes or not.
Thanks.
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Old 05-30-2012, 09:23 PM
Dave Bross Dave Bross is offline
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If it's a different color iron I would expect it to have a different level of oxidation/reduction.

Iron is sensitive to oxygen levels so you can probably expect a different color.

Maybe not different enough to even notice though.
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Old 05-31-2012, 05:50 AM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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It will really be a question of valence and oxygen supplied. Iron can have a lot of different valences. FeO, Fe203, Fe305... on and on.I have actually never heard of "Yellow" iron. Red and Black, Yes, Yellow, no. Some glasses want a lot of 02, some don't. It depends on your needs.
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Old 05-31-2012, 07:16 PM
Josh Bernbaum Josh Bernbaum is offline
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Did a melt today.
224g yellow iron oxide and 114g red copper oxide mixed in 50# SP87.
This recipe was courtesy of Ed Branson in western Massachusetts, although his had red iron and black copper.
Seems to be a nice turquoise-green.
The one at the top was my previous melt with a tiny bit of cobalt for the light blue.
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Old 05-31-2012, 08:08 PM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Bernbaum View Post
Did a melt today.
224g yellow iron oxide and 114g red copper oxide mixed in 50# SP87.
This recipe was courtesy of Ed Branson in western Massachusetts, although his had red iron and black copper.
Seems to be a nice turquoise-green.
The one at the top was my previous melt with a tiny bit of cobalt for the light blue.
******************
The top one actually looks like an intense copper glass to me Josh and the bottom certainly looks like iron and copper. Good Job!
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Old 05-31-2012, 11:17 PM
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yellow Iron oxide is common enough in ceramics. I think it is less intense than red and black but I don't really remember... Its used in crystalline glazes
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Old 06-01-2012, 09:36 AM
Steven O'Day Steven O'Day is online now
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Yellow iron - Fe2H2O4
Black iron Fe3O4
Red iron – Fe2O3
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Old 06-01-2012, 09:54 AM
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Here's more: ( Thanks Steve.)

Here's what that trustworthy wikipedia says: ( Wanna buy a bridge?)
The monohydrate (FeO(OH)·H2O) might otherwise be described as iron(III) hydroxide (Fe(OH)3), and is also known as hydrated iron oxide or yellow iron oxide.

You're buying contaminated water Josh.
Also:

What is important about it is that iron becomes a nucleation point for the growth of crystals which is why many old copper ruby formulas call for Iron in the mix.
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