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  #51  
Old 01-02-2018, 05:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jordan Kube View Post
Don't forget, process plays an important role in color formation.
I've found I can get Dino like results with the process I described. Doesn't look exactly like his but I've never been able to touch these colors blowing. I would stay away from mercury. There's a reason nobody uses it.
********
Bingo by the way! This glass wants different temps to get a strike. Then it wants a range in the lehr. Rod always looks better than the result using rod. This is glass that wants wretched excess and I think that's true in almost any really good glass I can think of. If you want gold ruby, you need pounds, not a chunk of rod. Making spectacular artwork involves lack of consideration of the materials you use. In reality. Gold Ruby costs about a buck a pound if you make it. Silvers are substantially less. The bottom line is to believe and make the jump. More and more of you are indeed doing it and you will benefit.

Mercury in my mind, at 68 is worth the pursuit.
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  #52  
Old 01-02-2018, 05:37 PM
Dan Vanantwerp Dan Vanantwerp is offline
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Thanks for the color sample Brian. I like that spectrum! I'm getting some pretty similar results with a fresh pot of the same ingredients you listed. Your backlit example (right side) makes me wonder if I'm chasing a lighting trick with the reds.

However, the pic of the Josh Simpson platter I posted looks like a fairly candid shot taken on someones deck. Some of his work is photographed in a light controlled setting and makes me wonder if things are being a bit enhanced. The area I've highlighted looks like a brilliant orange-pink-red...just would really like to see that come out straight of my annealer someday.

Pete, I'm not suggesting anyone is holding out, but I'm not always the sharpest tool in the shed either. When I read that this color likes to be thick I thought about color density...not anneal time. To me, thick=less blown. I've turned up my annealer as a single variable but can also adjust for a longer cool down. Thanks for talking slowly when it's obvious I'm not getting it.

Perhaps I can add something to the knowledge with my experiments with mercury in glass. It does scare me though...Dave and Rich's point is well taken. I've attached one of the very few things I've found relating to mercury as a glass pigment...seems alone to give a yellowish hue.
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File Type: jpg rare earth glasses.jpg (43.3 KB, 24 views)
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  #53  
Old 01-02-2018, 06:34 PM
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If it's a sulfide, more likely that's the sulfur.
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  #54  
Old 01-04-2018, 07:29 PM
Dan Vanantwerp Dan Vanantwerp is offline
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Well, let's ask him...

The above photo of rare earth glasses was lifted from a lecture by Dr. James Shelby, professor emeritus at Alfred University. Here is his response to an email request for clarification on the composition of the Hg labeled glass.
The full lecture can be found here:
http://www.lehigh.edu/imi/teched/Gla...loredGlass.pdf

"I am very sorry, but there is no mercury in that glass. My handwritten notation is very poor. The ďgĒ is really an ďoĒ. The glass contains holmium, not mercury. Although I have personally made a few thousand different glass compositions, Iíve never tried to put mercury in a glass (there are several elements I refuse to work with due to toxicity, including mercury, cadmium, tellurium, and selenium ó probably some others I donít remember right now).

I have read some place about getting some mercury into oxide glasses, but donít have any idea where. I think it was from work very long ago.

Sorry I canít help you on this. I never noticed how bad my lettering was on that slide. Hope no one else was misled.

James Shelby"

Dr. Shelby went on to offer some info about his work on colloidal formation in glass:

"On a separate subject, I did a lot of work on colloids my last few years before retirement. Had a lot of fun working with silver and copper, both with reduction using the tin in the surface of float glass and with reduction using hydrogen. A lot of the work involved diffusing the coloring ion into the glass by exchange with alkali ions in the glass. Since Iím not an artist, I never worked with the traditional method of striking to form the colloids.

We also worked with lots of other colloid formation. Arsenic and antimony formed brown glasses in low concentrations (less than 1 wt%). We also made colloids of nickel, cobalt (both magnetic), lead, bismuth, indium. All of those ions result in black glasses.

James Shelby"

Finally, I suggested that he might visit the Craft Web forum to learn about the artists' pursuit of color and glass chemistry. What a surprise response!

"...I would be interested in viewing your forum. While my own experience is in glass science, my daughter is an avid glassblower. We have had many interesting discussions regarding color form our different perspectives. Perhaps I can contribute to your forum from my perspective as well.

James Shelby"

Does anyone know his daughter? Is she possibly a member of the forum?

This really made me smile
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  #55  
Old 01-05-2018, 07:40 AM
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I find it odd that he would avoid selenium. It's hard to do a lot of color without it. The multi valent atoms are usually your friends.
I would say once again that the morbidity stats on people who melt glass just really show very little effect. The things that are killing off glassworkers are alcohol, tobacco, obesity and Cholesterol. A fair number have had heart attacks or blood clots. I know of one cancer of the kidneys but metal poisoning? I know of two in fifty plus years and they didn't die of it. They both recovered. In both of those cases, the circumstances were egregious.
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  #56  
Old 01-05-2018, 07:53 AM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete VanderLaan View Post
I find it odd that he would avoid selenium. It's hard to do a lot of color without it. The multi valent atoms are usually your friends.
I would say once again that the morbidity stats on people who melt glass just really show very little effect. The things that are killing off glassworkers are alcohol, tobacco, obesity and Cholesterol. A fair number have had heart attacks or blood clots. I know of one cancer of the kidneys but metal poisoning? I know of two in fifty plus years and they didn't die of it. They both recovered. In both of those cases, the circumstances were egregious.
Rob L. Had cadmium poisoning in penland years ago due to poor ventilation.
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  #57  
Old 01-05-2018, 08:44 AM
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Rob is one of the two I referred to. He was melting an opaque yellow for the Banana pieces and had a fan blowing warm air from under the hood to heat the studio. He did have extensive Chelation Therapy for it. The other was Hugh Jenkins when he was a grad assistant at RIT way back in the seventies as well. His professor had him melting a lead arsenate white every night in an unvented studio. That got the program shut down.

Those are to only two documented cases of that type of poisoning I know of. Paul Marioni did get extremely sick from eating a sandwich he got from a dumpster back in the mid seventies as well. I believe that was antimony poisoning and there's something to be said for not eating out of the school garbage can.
My real point there is that ventilation, gloves and a respirator are key to making your own glass. Casual use of a powder booth is another potential source but the facts don't aim at lung cancer from fiber nor kidney or liver failure from fumes. It's lifestyle that kills you.
Fritz has been melting batch glasses all his life. So has Mark Peiser and many of the renaissance glass instructors from the '60-90 period did as well. John Triggs died of a heart attack, Peet Robison, a blood clot. Henry Summa did die of Kidney cancer but he was never what I would call healthy during his life having had Hepatitis early on. All these guys melted raw glasses a lot. Dreisbach and Peiser are about 80 years old now. They're fine. Penland people have done raw glass forever. Levin was the only one to ever get ill.
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  #58  
Old 01-05-2018, 10:22 AM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is online now
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I think of elio quisari (sp?). He swore by his Teflon parchoffis. Died of lung cancer. I have always wonder it it was related.
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Old 01-05-2018, 11:05 AM
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John Chiles ex wife used to be on a tear about having blood testing for people in art studios. It was a big push she made while on the Board of Gas. Then I found out she was a smoker. It's the first question I always ask when people die of lung cancer.

Was he a smoker?

I have always heard teflon was toxic but I don't really have anything to back that up with. I never used the tool.
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  #60  
Old 01-05-2018, 04:55 PM
Jordan Kube Jordan Kube is offline
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The insidious thing about Teflon is it accumulates in your body and doesn't leave. Once it's there it's there. It's been deemed "safe" for cook ware but only if you don't get it above a certain temperature. We are definitely using it at higher temperatures where it can smoke and enter the body. Boy are they smooth jacks though.
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  #61  
Old 01-05-2018, 06:11 PM
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I've been at it since I was 19. I'm 68 . We're all going to die. I think if anyone tried anything risky, I did. I was never stupid about it, never contemptuous. Learning is a process.
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Old 01-05-2018, 06:23 PM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jordan Kube View Post
The insidious thing about Teflon is it accumulates in your body and doesn't leave. Once it's there it's there. It's been deemed "safe" for cook ware but only if you don't get it above a certain temperature. We are definitely using it at higher temperatures where it can smoke and enter the body. Boy are they smooth jacks though.
I had bought a couple sticks and made a pair back in the 90's. I distinctly remember opening up a piece that was clear and got a huge waft of a nasty chemical smell. Off they went and into the trash can.
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Old 01-06-2018, 09:26 AM
Josh Bernbaum Josh Bernbaum is online now
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They had the teflon sticks for parcioffis at the studio in Japan where I recently taught a workshop. They recommended holding my breath while I used them, so I asked them to put wood sticks in the handle I was using instead. I've been around enough nasty shit so far, don't need to be exposed to any more..
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  #64  
Old 01-06-2018, 03:07 PM
Dan Vanantwerp Dan Vanantwerp is offline
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Here's an article about teflon toxicity...read on if you want to like Dupont even less.

https://greenlivingideas.com/2012/06...xic-is-teflon/
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  #65  
Old 01-06-2018, 04:21 PM
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teflon, including the stuff in our kitchen never seemed like a good plan to me. I had a stick and only used it once. Cadmium? Now Cadmium I like....makes this yellow.
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  #66  
Old 01-06-2018, 06:33 PM
Steven O'Day Steven O'Day is online now
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Fritz had zinc shakes. Don't think he ever figured out where it came from.

Ventilation is good but think about where it goes when it leaves the vent as well.
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Old 01-06-2018, 06:39 PM
Steven O'Day Steven O'Day is online now
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I vaguely remember Elio mentioning that he smoked but gave it up.
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Old 01-07-2018, 06:59 AM
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Quote:
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Fritz had zinc shakes. Don't think he ever figured out where it came from.

Ventilation is good but think about where it goes when it leaves the vent as well.
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