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Old 07-05-2019, 09:05 PM
Ron Mynatt Ron Mynatt is offline
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inconel

Does anyone have a good inconel fabricator that they would recommend.I need to put a section at the bottom of my Hub consolidated furnace door.
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Old 07-06-2019, 08:39 AM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Mynatt View Post
Does anyone have a good inconel fabricator that they would recommend.I need to put a section at the bottom of my Hub consolidated furnace door.
I donít but let me save you a lot of trouble. On the bottom of the door, do not weld in a piece of angle iron, but instead use a strip of flat stock with a piece of rebar welded on the inside surface. It will do a good job of not flexing and will hold on to the refractory castable .
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Old 07-08-2019, 10:44 AM
Eric Trulson Eric Trulson is offline
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I've done a reasonable amount of inconel machining in the past - It's not as terrible as folks like to talk about, but you need a really solid machine with a powerful spindle to do it. Carbide cutting tools are mandatory, and insert tooling will end up being kinder on your wallet.

Abrasive cutting disks can also work for simple fabrication cuts (chopping linear stock down to length or something) - depends on the grade of inconel, some can be cut with standard aluminum oxide disks, others (inconel 718 in particular) need specific abrasive formulations.

What are you trying to accomplish? For a furnace door, I'd almost certainly go with a refractory hot face and mild steel structural component(s) on the outside - Inconel isn't necessary if the metal has some refractory in between it and the furnace heat, and using it going to add some real difficulty to things compared to mild steel. You sure you need it?
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Old 07-08-2019, 07:25 PM
Art Freas Art Freas is offline
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Iconel is really cool stuff. I guy I worked with had some used bolts from the SRB testing for the shuttle. The head and the nut on these were about 6 inches across and the shaft about 2 inches in diameter and about 1.5 feet long. They could only use them once.
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Old 07-08-2019, 08:21 PM
Ron Mynatt Ron Mynatt is offline
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I have Mazzou as the refractory and have 2 " * .25 " angle on the outside .The angle iron is cut and welded at a angle to hold in the Mazzou. Since the Hub furnace swirls the flame counter clockwise the flame always hits the right side and bottom edge of the angle iron hard . I have replaced the bottom piece every year and over the blowing season it starts falling apart and dropping bits in the pot. The inconel piece that the fiberglass manufacturer gave me held great just not the welds that held it to the carbon steel. I have a air cylinder that lifts the door up above the opening so nothing can be on the inside edge . They offered me some more of the inconel plates that the fiberglass streams thru and i am thinking of tapping and bolting it on the carbon steel frame.
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Old 07-09-2019, 09:50 AM
Eric Trulson Eric Trulson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Mynatt View Post
I have Mazzou as the refractory and have 2 " * .25 " angle on the outside .The angle iron is cut and welded at a angle to hold in the Mazzou. Since the Hub furnace swirls the flame counter clockwise the flame always hits the right side and bottom edge of the angle iron hard . I have replaced the bottom piece every year and over the blowing season it starts falling apart and dropping bits in the pot. The inconel piece that the fiberglass manufacturer gave me held great just not the welds that held it to the carbon steel. I have a air cylinder that lifts the door up above the opening so nothing can be on the inside edge . They offered me some more of the inconel plates that the fiberglass streams thru and i am thinking of tapping and bolting it on the carbon steel frame.
Oh, cool. Given that context, an inconel plate on the bottom of your furnace door actually sounds like a great solution. This shop looks local to you and likely has experience with hard materials: http://www.arktool.com/ (no clue if they do small one-off work - maybe stop by in person with some nice glass to grease palms?)

If you wanted to do it in-house, you could give it a try cutting the plate to size with an abrasive disk or saw, or a plasma cutter if you have access to one. I think bolting the inconel plate in place is definitely the best approach, welds involving high nickel/chromium metals (like inconel) have a tendency to be brittle and crack with repeated thermal cycling.

Tapping the inco plate might give you problems, if it does you can always just drill thru-holes, weld some threaded rod onto the steel frame protruding out and then use some beefy nuts to clamp the inco plate down to the outside. Good luck!
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Old 07-09-2019, 01:19 PM
Ron Mynatt Ron Mynatt is offline
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Eric,Thanks for the info.That company only works with round stock so they could not help.Thanks again
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