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  #1  
Old 05-12-2002, 12:47 PM
Joe Ruelle
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Roll-up Technique

Has anyone built or seen a fusing oven that has been built specifically for the "roll-up techniqe"? Or if not, if anyone who has learned or works with the technique; what features would a oven made specifically for this technique have built in to it?

I haven't tried the technique yet, but it looks like it would be good technique for a weekend warrior like myself who wants to blow, but not run a furnace 7/24.

Thanks, Joe from Wisconsin
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  #2  
Old 05-12-2002, 11:57 PM
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Kurt Walrath Kurt Walrath is offline
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Hey Joe-
I took the class and use the technique.
You dont roll it up out of the oven, you preheat
it and then get it hot enough to roll in the glory. hot enough to roll is hot enough to run
and it would stick to your ferro and or bleed if held in a kiln for any time at rolling temperature.

I've thought about trying to roll up out of the oven but I think that there's no really good reason for doing it that way that I can figure.

You can load your fused panels into your annealer
and transfer them to the glory from there.
Fuse them in any oven that will go to 1600.

It's not a cheap way to make glass. fusable sheets are expensive and the labor is long.

It's a really cool technique though.... I don't
think you can do somthing like this very easy
with kugler.
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  #3  
Old 05-13-2002, 12:23 PM
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Kurt Walrath Kurt Walrath is offline
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Joe-
You can use anything that you would use for canework.
Steel, Cast iron, Kilnshelf (my preferance ). The Aussies use
Steel, covered with
kilnwash. I like to use Bullseye fraxpaper to
prevent sticking.

It is easiest to be able to
fork them out of the oven and into the glory
without having to handle them directly.

I'm in the middle of building a clamshell
style oven with elements in the lid that will
fuse and reheat the plates for pickup.
I think that is the best most versatile setup.

This oven will also be handy for preheating shards
or murrine that you would pick up on a bubble.

I would suggest that you practise blowing cane before you start rolling up fused plates as you
can get up to speed in the pick up learning curve
with cane much easier. Cane is much more forgiving than solid fused sheets and alot cheaper even if you have to buy it from spectrum, or moretti, or
maybe from some board member. I've known a few people with just a kiln and a glory who blew with
bought cane. I think it's easier to pick up cane
solo also although I wouldnt want to myself.

Kurt
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Old 05-13-2002, 02:29 PM
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Mark Wilson Mark Wilson is offline
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i do a modified version of this technique. i arrange color rods, or color strips that i cut from sheet glass, on a heated cane marver. the cast iron cane marver (steinert) is heated on a hot plate to 1100F and then picked up on a 1st or 2nd gather. to get to 1100F, i have an insulated lid on top of the hot plate/cane marver. i posted a picture of some color rods (bullseye) arranged in a spectral pattern.
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Old 05-13-2002, 05:23 PM
Lonnie Strunk Lonnie Strunk is offline
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cane marver

Mark, what kind of hot plate do you have that will get to 1100 degrees ? Where do you get one and what is approx cost ?
Thanks Lonnie
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Old 05-13-2002, 05:44 PM
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Scott Dunahee Scott Dunahee is offline
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hot plate

Quote:
Originally posted by Lonnie Strunk
Mark, what kind of hot plate do you have that will get to 1100 degrees ? Where do you get one and what is approx cost ?
Thanks Lonnie
I have a cheapy single burner that I bought at surplus. I'd guess it gets to over 700 F but not much over. Anyway, hot enough that I can drop spectrum sheet or pieces of rondel on the steel plate while hot and not break it. Once it's soaked a few minutes, I can bring it up to temp with an Exact hand torch (gently at first) so it's ready to pick up in under a minute. I use no kiln wash and mild steel "pastorelli's" ( 1/4 inch plate cut to size) that I change out for ease in arranging on a cold sheet instead of doing it hot. I've NEVER has such clean pickups using any other method. Also works great if substituting a ribbed cane plate from Steinert.

Right now I'm making some tail lights for a heavily modified rebuilt 1936 Chevrolet Sedan. Fun.

BSD
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Old 05-13-2002, 10:19 PM
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i use a double burner cook stove range unit that i bought from walmart. i took out the thermal cut out switch, added some insulation, and most important of all, added an insulated lid. without the lid, the best you can get to is about 700 to 800F. the lid keeps the heat in and eliminate convection cooling. i also heat the glass with a mapp gas torch right before pickup, so the glass could be 1200 to 1300F, but i don't have any way to measure it. i measure the hot plate temperature with a type j thermocouple.
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  #8  
Old 05-13-2002, 10:37 PM
Joe Ruelle
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I found a link that shows some fused/blown pieces that are inspiring: http://www.glassaustralia.anu.edu.au...s/p3.bett.html

Kurt, will you have room in your clam-style fuser for more than one fused panel? If so, that would probably be easier to build than a stacked pizza style oven that I originally asked for input on.

Joe from Wisconsin
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  #9  
Old 05-14-2002, 05:07 AM
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Jon Myers Jon Myers is offline
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Elio hellificanremberhislastname, a awesome Italian glassblower, came to Firehouse 12 for a workshop and he was remarking on how interesting it was that most Americians that were doing rollups were doing the glory hole/pasturali method. He said that the majority of the Italians use a clamshell kiln just deep enough for one layer (2.5 inches or so) with elements in the top and no bottom (just a stainless rack to hold the pasturelli) The reason that the kiln had no bottom was to keep the metal pasturalli as cool as possible while getting the glass as hot as possible. He said that some people used a little fan aimed at the bottom of the metal plate. I don't know if they use kilnwash, I didn't think to ask.
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Old 05-14-2002, 05:12 AM
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Brian Blanthorn Brian Blanthorn is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jon Myers
Elio hellificanremberhislastname, a awesome Italian glassblower, came to Firehouse 12 for a workshop and he was remarking on how interesting it was that most Americians that were doing rollups were doing the glory hole/pasturali method. He said that the majority of the Italians use a clamshell kiln just deep enough for one layer (2.5 inches or so) with elements in the top and no bottom (just a stainless rack to hold the pasturelli) The reason that the kiln had no bottom was to keep the metal pasturalli as cool as possible while getting the glass as hot as possible. He said that some people used a little fan aimed at the bottom of the metal plate. I don't know if they use kilnwash, I didn't think to ask.
I expect no kiln wash

Reason being is that the cool plate should not stick 2 the glass

All this wash / fibre seporator stuff etc is just asking 4 trouble

A very intersting solution 2 the problem

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Old 01-01-2003, 11:41 AM
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Pete VanderLaan Pete VanderLaan is offline
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