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  #1  
Old 02-19-2018, 01:46 AM
Mike McCain
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Turning powders into paint

Anyone done this? My experience so far is that CMC/Tylose thickener is like trying to paint with ketchup/catsup. Lol literally using a ketchup dispenser. If you spell it catsup, don't talk to me.
My generation kinda missed Paradise paints, whatta loss. I mean, I got my hands on some and somehow lost it. Lol.
I just tried a 50/50 ratio of powder to Lyndsay Doyle and yeah, you still have to shove it around instead of painting with it, but man I can get great lines with it. Much finer than PP.
Only problem is the oil kinda yellows everything.

Anyone pursuing oil on glass? Or maybe there's a super clear oil you can think of off the cuff, one that burns off clean and clear?

Last edited by Mike McCain; 02-19-2018 at 02:18 AM. Reason: Update?
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Old 02-19-2018, 02:20 AM
Mike McCain
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Selfish. I wanted this to show up before my response to the diy response.

Last edited by Mike McCain; 02-19-2018 at 02:21 AM. Reason: .4:20 a.m. just to make Pete question me
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Old 02-19-2018, 08:57 AM
Tony Serviente Tony Serviente is offline
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What are you trying to do Mike? Paint flat glass and fire I assume?
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Old 02-19-2018, 10:53 AM
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Randy Kaltenbach Randy Kaltenbach is offline
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I've used gum arabic as a binder with Reusch and similar powders. Thinned with either water, vinegar, or antifreeze. Never tried it with glass powders like Gaffer or Reichenbach.
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Old 02-19-2018, 11:56 AM
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You may be in over your head.
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Old 02-19-2018, 12:40 PM
Dan Vanantwerp Dan Vanantwerp is offline
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I've used liquid stringer and powdered glass with some success. I even took out a loan and bought some dichro powder to use as accent in some graal pieces. Just have to find the right ratio. I believe the stuff is pretty cheap.
There are also some glass paints you can buy from fusing places that work ok. I like the liquid stringer/powder combo best though...
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Old 02-19-2018, 01:15 PM
Steven O'Day Steven O'Day is offline
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Reusche sells a bunch of different mediums. Gum arabic works well but tends to dry quickly.

The main issue with painting with blowing colors is that they are too coarse, they really need to be ground finer to work.

Reusche also sells a line of enamels for hot glass, I haven't tried them and am curious if anyone has experience with them.
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Old 02-19-2018, 04:53 PM
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Thanks for the advice.
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Old 02-19-2018, 07:38 PM
Eben Horton Eben Horton is online now
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Paradise paints used pine oil I believe
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Old 02-20-2018, 06:24 AM
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just keep in mind that it won't ever go into solution. You need a far finer ground powder than the color companies will provide, more around the level of German aluminum for explosives.
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Old 02-21-2018, 03:57 AM
Michael Ahlefeldt-Laurvig Michael Ahlefeldt-Laurvig is offline
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This is a glass pigment muller
https://goo.gl/images/E3Yg5G
It is used to fine grind pigments and enamels- even commercially bought enamels perform better when they are ground finer. The enamel is mixed with water or oil on a piece of sandblasted plate glass and the muller is moved in a circular motion until desired consistency is reached. I have made several through the years, for stained glass painters and porcelain painters
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Old 02-21-2018, 12:15 PM
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I was going to try mortar and pestle, but this seems like a neat way to go. Thanks Michael.
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Old 02-21-2018, 12:34 PM
Michael Ahlefeldt-Laurvig Michael Ahlefeldt-Laurvig is offline
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No no, this how its done. Think a couple of teaspoons at the most and 20 min grinding, add water or oil as needed. Arabic gum is also good to make it dry to the glass and stick
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Old 02-21-2018, 01:10 PM
Michael Ahlefeldt-Laurvig Michael Ahlefeldt-Laurvig is offline
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Bloody hell Pete, can you make aluminum explode? I still want to know how to make good whiskey!
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Old 02-21-2018, 01:44 PM
Charles Friedman Charles Friedman is offline
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Add some glycerin. It will smooth things out.
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Old 02-21-2018, 02:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Ahlefeldt-Laurvig View Post
Bloody hell Pete, can you make aluminum explode? I still want to know how to make good whiskey!
********
Aluminum powder was banned for sale in the US for about 8 years after 9/11. My kid used to make stuff that blew stumps using that with potassium per Chlor ate. Straight Clor ate is far more unstable.
I'm talking a fine grade where it just looks like shiny silver paint on your fingers. Profoundly dangerous stuff. You can buy it on Amazon these days in small quantities. It certainly doesn't take much. Most of his loads were 35 grams or less. Don't get confused with charles stuff. glycerine is a serious hydrocarbon and really is dangerous to handle.

He made flash powder as well. That was entertaining. I haven't made any single malts in a while. It's just really time consuming.
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Old 02-21-2018, 04:30 PM
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Aluminum dust is quite combustible. The first metal fab shop I worked in in Seattle we had a heavy door/gate thing made out of copper plate with an aluminum support/frame. The guy that was making the aluminum frame was working on a vented table. He'd been dressing (grinding) the finished welds on the same surface, and the dust had built up in the catchment below the table. He went to do some touch-up work, and a spark from the welding ignited the pile of dust below. The added oxygen from the air being pulled into the chamber made things get exciting really fast.

He's really lucky it didn't actually explode.
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Old 02-22-2018, 07:11 AM
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It needs to be really fine , around 9-10 micron. Then watch it.
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Old 02-25-2018, 05:25 AM
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I assume that you can make your own muller with furnace glass? Or is it something special.
Franklin
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  #20  
Old 02-26-2018, 01:19 PM
Michael Ahlefeldt-Laurvig Michael Ahlefeldt-Laurvig is offline
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Yes, normal glass, any glass
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